Environmental Health Officers develop, enforce and evaluate environmental health policies, programs and strategies to improve health outcomes, and oversee the implementation and monitoring of environmental health legislation.

Specialisations: Food Safety Auditor, Food Safety Officer.

You usually need a bachelor degree in environmental health, environmental science, health science, public health or another related field to work as an Environmental Health Officer. Training is also available through VET (Vocational Education and Training).

Tasks

  • Develops, implements and reviews environmental health management plans and occupational health and safety plans.
  • Prepares and implements plans and strategies for the safe, economic and suitable disposal of commercial, industrial, medical and household wastes.
  • Advises on and enforces relevant legislation.
  • Implements prevention programs and strategies for communicable diseases, food safety, waste water treatment and disposal systems, recreation and domestic water quality and any contaminated or hazardous substances.
  • Works to minimise air, sea, water and noise pollution to improve health outcomes.
  • Identifies hazards, assesses and controls risks in the workplace.
  • Develops, implements and monitors programs minimising workplace and environmental pollution involving chemical and physical hazards.
  • Promotes ergonomic principles within the workplace such as matching furniture, equipment and work activities to the needs of employees.
  • Inspects and audits workplaces, processes, plant, chemical and physical hazards for legislative compliance.
  • Trains employees in personal protective equipment and safe working procedures.
  • Records and investigates injuries and equipment damage, as well as reporting on safety performance.
  • Co-ordinates the return of injured workers into the workplace.

More about Occupational & Environmental Health Professionals

All Occupational & Environmental Health Professionals

  • $1,914 Weekly Pay
  • Strong Future Growth
  • Average unemployment Unemployment

Environmental Health Officers

  • 3,600 workers Employment Size
  • Very high skill Skill level rating
  • 76% Full-Time Full-Time Share
  • 41 hours Average full-time
  • 42 years Average age
  • 54% female Gender Share

The number of people working as Environmental Health Officers (in their main job) stayed about the same over 5 years:
from 3,500 in 2011 to 3,600 in 2016.

  • Size: This is a very small occupation.
  • Location: Environmental Health Officers work in many regions of Australia.
  • Industries: Most work in Public Administration and Safety; Health Care and Social Assistance; and Professional, Scientific and Technical Services.
  • Full-time: Many work full-time (76%, higher than the average of 66%).
  • Hours: Full-time workers spend around 41 hours per week at work (compared to the average of 44 hours).
  • Age: The average age is 42 years (compared to the average of 40 years).
  • Gender: 54% of workers are female (compared to the average of 48%).

Employment Outlook

Number of Workers

No data is available for the selected graph for this Occupation.

Weekly Earnings

Weekly Earnings (Before Tax)

No data is available for the selected graph for this Occupation.

Main Industries

Main Employing Industries (% Share)

Source: Based on ABS Census 2016, Customised Report. Industries are based on the Australian and New Zealand Standard Industrial Classification (ANZSIC 06).
Main Employing IndustriesIndustry (% share)
Public Administration and Safety56.5
Health Care and Social Assistance20.7
Professional, Scientific and Technical Services5.5
Manufacturing4.1
Other Industries13.2

States and Territories

  • NSW

  • VIC

  • QLD

  • SA

  • TAS

  • NT

  • ACT

Employment by State and Territory (% Share)

Source: Based on Based on ABS Census 2016, Customised Report. Share of workers across Australian States and Territories, in this job compared to the all jobs average.
StateEnvironmental Health OfficersAll Jobs Average
NSW27.731.6
VIC23.325.6
QLD23.220.0
SA8.17.0
WA11.710.8
TAS2.82.0
NT1.01.0
ACT2.21.9

Age Profile

Age Profile (% Share)

Source: Based on Based on ABS Census 2016, Customised Report. Age profile of workers in this job compared to the all jobs average.
Age BracketEnvironmental Health OfficersAll Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
15-190.5-5.05.0
20-244.6-9.39.3
25-3423.4-22.922.9
35-4427.5-22.022.0
45-5424.3-21.621.6
55-599.9-9.09.0
60-646.7-6.06.0
65 and Over3.2-4.24.2

Education Level

Highest Level of Education (% Share)

Source: ABS, ABS Census 2016, Customised Report. Highest qualification completed by workers in this job (in any field of study). Qualifications needed by new workers might be different from the qualifications of workers already in the job.
Type of QualificationEnvironmental Health OfficersAll Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
Post Graduate/Graduate Diploma or Graduate Certificate19.0-10.110.1
Bachelor degree44.8-21.821.8
Advanced Diploma/Diploma15.1-11.611.6
Certificate III/IV9.9-21.121.1
Year 126.0-18.118.1
Year 111.0-4.84.8
Year 10 and below4.1-12.512.5

You usually need a bachelor degree in environmental health, environmental science, health science, public health or another related field to work as an Environmental Health Officer. Training is also available through VET (Vocational Education and Training).

Membership with the Environmental Health Australia may be useful.

Thinking about study or training?

Before starting a course, check it will provide you with the skills and qualifications you need.

  • Search and compare thousands of higher education courses, and their entry requirements from different institutions across Australia at Course Seeker website.
  • Compare undergraduate and postgraduate student experiences and outcomes on the QILT website.
  • Compare Vocational Education and Training (VET) courses, providers and student outcomes on the My Skills website.
  • You might be interested in Health Industry and Public Sector VET training pathways on the AAPathways website.

Or check out related courses on Job Outlook.

Useful links and resources


The course listings on this page are provided by Good Education Group.

Employers look for Occupational & Environmental Health Professionals who are caring and empathetic and can work well in a team, with the ability to communicate with a diverse range of people.

Filter Skills & Knowledge

Knowledge

These are important topics, subjects or knowledge areas.

  1. Education and Training

    79% Skill level

    Curriculum and training design, teaching and instruction for individuals and groups, and the measurement of training effects.

  2. Customer and Personal Service

    71% Skill level

    Understanding customer needs, providing good quality service, and measuring customer satisfaction.

  3. Mathematics

    68% Skill level

    Arithmetic, algebra, geometry, calculus, or statistics.

  4. English Language

    66% Skill level

    English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.

  5. Chemistry

    65% Skill level

    Chemical composition, structure, and properties. How chemicals are made, used, mixed, and can change.

Occupational Information Network
O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.
The skills and importance ratings on this page are derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2, 29-9011.00 - Occupational Health and Safety Specialists.

Learn about the daily activities, and physical and social demands faced by workers. Explore the values and work styles that workers rate as most important.

Filter Work Environment

Demands

The physical and social demands workers face most often are shown below.

  1. Electronic Mail

    97% Important

    How often do you use electronic mail?

  2. Face-to-Face Discussions

    96% Important

    How often do you talk with people face-to-face?

  3. Telephone

    93% Important

    How often do you talk on the telephone?

  4. Responsible for Others' Health and Safety

    90% Important

    How responsible are you for the health and safety of others?

  5. Wear Common Protective or Safety Equipment

    87% Important

    How often do you wear equipment like safety shoes, glasses, gloves, hard hats or life jackets?

Occupational Information Network
O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.
The skills and importance ratings on this page are derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2, 29-9011.00 - Occupational Health and Safety Specialists.

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