Judicial and Other Legal Professionals hear legal and other matters in courts and tribunals; interpret, analyse, administer and provide advice on the law; and draft legislation.

    Judicial and Other Legal Professionals are usually appointed by a State or Federal Governor or Attorney-General. To be eligible, you need to have completed a law degree and have been licensed to practise law for a minimum of eight years, although most Judicial and Other Legal Professionals have a lot more experience before being appointed. Many Judicial and Other Legal Professionals complete postgraduate studies.

    Tasks

    • researching statutes and previous court decisions relevant to cases
    • conducting trials and hearings
    • calling and questioning witnesses
    • hearing and evaluating arguments and evidence in civil and criminal summary matters
    • deciding penalties and sentences within statutory limits, such as fines, bonds and detention, awarding damages in civil matters, and issuing court orders
    • exercising arbitral powers if resolution is not achieved or seems improbable through conciliation
    • preparing settlement memoranda and obtaining signatures of parties
    • advising government of legal, constitutional and parliamentary matters and drafting bills and attending committee meetings during consideration of bills
    • preparing advice on matters associated with intellectual property rights
    • advising clients and agents on legal and technical matters

    More about Judicial and Other Legal Professionals

    All Judicial and Other Legal Professionals

    All Judicial and Other Legal Professionals

    • $1,978 Weekly Pay
    • Strong Future Growth
    • Average unemployment Unemployment
    • 12,500 workers Employment Size
    • Very high skill Skill level rating
    • 73% Full-Time Full-Time Share
    • 45 hours Average full-time
    • 45 years Average age
    • 58% female Gender Share

    The number of people working as Judicial and Other Legal Professionals (in their main job) grew very strongly over the past 5 years and is expected to grow strongly over the next 5 years:
    from 12,500 in 2018 to 13,600 by 2023.
    Job openings can come from new jobs being created, but most come from turnover (workers leaving).
    There are likely to be around 4,000 job openings over 5 years (that's about 800 a year).

    • Size: This is a medium sized occupation.
    • Unemployment: Unemployment was average in 2018.
    • Location: Judicial and Other Legal Professionals work in many regions of Australia.
    • Industries: Most work in Public Administration and Safety; Professional, Scientific and Technical Services; and Health Care and Social Assistance.
    • Earnings: Full-time workers on an adult wage earn around $1,978 per week (higher than the average of $1,460). Earnings tend to be lower when starting out and higher as experience grows.
    • Full-time: Many work full-time (73%, higher than the average of 66%).
    • Hours: Full-time workers spend around 45 hours per week at work (compared to the average of 44 hours).
    • Age: The average age is 45 years (compared to the average of 40 years). Many workers are 45 years or older (52%).
    • Gender: 58% of workers are female (compared to the average of 48%).

    Employment Outlook

    Number of Workers

    Source: ABS Labour Force Survey, Department of Jobs and Small Business trend data to May 2018 and Department of Jobs and Small Business projections to 2023.
    YearNumber of Workers
    20088800
    20099900
    201011800
    20118500
    20126800
    20138900
    201410400
    201512600
    201612300
    20179700
    201812500
    202313600

    Weekly Earnings

    Weekly Earnings (Before Tax)

    Source: Based on ABS Survey of Employee Earnings and Hours (cat. no. 6306.0), May 2018, Customised Report. Median weekly total cash earnings for full-time non-managerial employees paid at the adult rate. Earnings are before tax and include amounts salary sacrificed. Earnings can vary greatly depending on the skills and experience of the worker and the demands of the role. These figures should be used as a guide only, not to determine a wage rate.
    EarningsJudicial and Other Legal ProfessionalsAll Jobs Average
    Full-Time Earnings19781460

    Main Industries

    Main Employing Industries (% Share)

    Source: Based on ABS Census 2016, Customised Report. Industries are based on the Australian and New Zealand Standard Industrial Classification (ANZSIC 06).
    Main Employing IndustriesIndustry (% share)
    Public Administration and Safety49.0
    Professional, Scientific and Technical Services22.5
    Health Care and Social Assistance7.2
    Financial and Insurance Services5.9
    Other Industries15.4

    States and Territories

    • NSW

    • VIC

    • QLD

    • SA

    • TAS

    • NT

    • ACT

    Employment by State and Territory (% Share)

    Source: Based on Based on ABS Census 2016, Customised Report. Share of workers across Australian States and Territories, in this job compared to the all jobs average.
    StateJudicial and Other Legal ProfessionalsAll Jobs Average
    NSW31.531.6
    VIC28.925.6
    QLD16.220.0
    SA5.67.0
    WA8.310.8
    TAS1.92.0
    NT1.11.0
    ACT6.51.9

    Age Profile

    Age Profile (% Share)

    Source: Based on Based on ABS Census 2016, Customised Report. Age profile of workers in this job compared to the all jobs average.
    Age BracketJudicial and Other Legal ProfessionalsAll Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
    15-190.2-5.05.0
    20-243.4-9.39.3
    25-3421.1-22.922.9
    35-4423.3-22.022.0
    45-5422.1-21.621.6
    55-5910.5-9.09.0
    60-6410.2-6.06.0
    65 and Over9.2-4.24.2

    Education Level

    Highest Level of Education (% Share)

    Source: ABS, ABS Census 2016, Customised Report. Highest qualification completed by workers in this job (in any field of study). Qualifications needed by new workers might be different from the qualifications of workers already in the job.
    Type of QualificationJudicial and Other Legal ProfessionalsAll Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
    Post Graduate/Graduate Diploma or Graduate Certificate36.2-10.110.1
    Bachelor degree49.5-21.821.8
    Advanced Diploma/Diploma4.3-11.611.6
    Certificate III/IV2.4-21.121.1
    Year 125.7-18.118.1
    Year 110.6-4.84.8
    Year 10 and below1.2-12.512.5

    Judicial and Other Legal Professionals are usually appointed by a State or Federal Governor or Attorney-General. To be eligible, you need to have completed a law degree and have been licensed to practise law for a minimum of eight years, although most Judicial and Other Legal Professionals have a lot more experience before being appointed. Many Judicial and Other Legal Professionals complete postgraduate studies.

    Registration with the relevant state or territory board may be needed to work as a Judicial or Other Legal Professional.

    Checks, licences and tickets

    You may need:

    • national police check

    Thinking about study or training?

    Before starting a course, check it will provide you with the skills and qualifications you need.

    • Search and compare thousands of higher education courses, and their entry requirements from different institutions across Australia at Course Seeker website.
    • Compare undergraduate and postgraduate student experiences and outcomes on the QILT website.

    Or check out related courses on Job Outlook.

    Useful links and resources


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      85% Skill level

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    3. Psychology

      74% Skill level

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    4. Customer and Personal Service

      66% Skill level

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    5. Public Safety and Security

      57% Skill level

      Use of equipment, rules and ideas to protect people, data, property, and institutions.

    Occupational Information Network
    O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.
    The skills and importance ratings on this page are derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2, 23-1023.00 - Judges, Magistrate Judges, and Magistrates.

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    1. Freedom to Make Decisions

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      99% Important

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      99% Important

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      97% Important

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    Occupational Information Network
    O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.
    The skills and importance ratings on this page are derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2, 23-1023.00 - Judges, Magistrate Judges, and Magistrates.

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