Intellectual Property Lawyers provide legal advice, prepare and draft legal documents, and conduct negotiations on behalf of clients on matters associated with protecting intellectual capital, utilising patent law, copyright law and licensing.

Specialisations: Patent Attorney, Trade Mark Attorney.

A law degree or a degree in science or engineering is needed to work as an Intellectual Property Lawyer. A relevant postgraduate degree, such as a Masters of Intellectual Property Law may be useful.

Tasks

  • Receives written information in the form of briefs and verbal instructions concerning cases from solicitors, other specialist legal professionals and clients.
  • Provides advice and written opinions on points of intellectual property law.
  • Confers with clients and witnesses in preparation for court proceedings.
  • Draws up pleadings, affidavits and other court documents.
  • Researches statutes and previous court decisions relevant to cases.
  • Outlines the facts to the court, calls up and questions witnesses and addresses the court to argue a client's case.
  • Provides opinion on complex intellectual property issues.
  • May draw up or settle documents.
  • Interviews clients to determine the nature of problems, then recommends and undertakes appropriate legal action.
  • Prepares cases for court by conducting investigations, undertaking research, giving notice of court actions and arranging the preparation and attendance of witnesses.
  • Prepares and critically reviews contracts between parties.

All Judicial and Other Legal Professionals

  • $1,978 Weekly Pay
  • Strong Future Growth
  • Average unemployment Unemployment

Intellectual Property Lawyers

  • 730 workers Employment Size
  • Very high skill Skill level rating
  • 83% Full-Time Full-Time Share
  • 47 hours Average full-time
  • 43 years Average age
  • 36% female Gender Share

This is an emerging occupation, included in the Australian Census for the first time in 2016

  • Size: This is a very small occupation.
  • Location: Intellectual Property Lawyers work in many parts of Australia. New South WalesVictoria has a large share of workers.
  • Industries: Most work in Professional, Scientific and Technical Services; Other Services; and Manufacturing.
  • Full-time: Most work full-time (83%, much higher than the average of 66%).
  • Hours: Full-time workers spend around 47 hours per week at work (compared to the average of 44 hours).
  • Age: The average age is 43 years (compared to the average of 40 years).
  • Gender: 36% of workers are female (compared to the average of 48%).

Employment Outlook

Number of Workers

No data is available for the selected graph for this Occupation.

Weekly Earnings

Weekly Earnings (Before Tax)

No data is available for the selected graph for this Occupation.

Main Industries

Main Employing Industries (% Share)

Source: Based on ABS Census 2016, Customised Report. Industries are based on the Australian and New Zealand Standard Industrial Classification (ANZSIC 06).
Main Employing IndustriesIndustry (% share)
Professional, Scientific and Technical Services89.0
Other Services3.3
Manufacturing2.4
Rental, Hiring and Real Estate Services2.0
Other Industries3.3

States and Territories

  • NSW

  • VIC

  • QLD

  • SA

  • TAS

  • NT

  • ACT

Employment by State and Territory (% Share)

Source: Based on Based on ABS Census 2016, Customised Report. Share of workers across Australian States and Territories, in this job compared to the all jobs average.
StateIntellectual Property LawyersAll Jobs Average
NSW36.531.6
VIC36.725.6
QLD12.120.0
SA6.77.0
WA6.310.8
TAS0.02.0
NT0.01.0
ACT1.61.9

Age Profile

Age Profile (% Share)

Source: Based on Based on ABS Census 2016, Customised Report. Age profile of workers in this job compared to the all jobs average.
Age BracketIntellectual Property LawyersAll Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
15-190.0-5.05.0
20-240.5-9.39.3
25-3421.2-22.922.9
35-4433.2-22.022.0
45-5430.1-21.621.6
55-596.9-9.09.0
60-643.6-6.06.0
65 and Over4.4-4.24.2

Education Level

Highest Level of Education (% Share)

Source: ABS, ABS Census 2016, Customised Report. Highest qualification completed by workers in this job (in any field of study). Qualifications needed by new workers might be different from the qualifications of workers already in the job.
Type of QualificationIntellectual Property LawyersAll Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
Post Graduate/Graduate Diploma or Graduate Certificate65.8-10.110.1
Bachelor degree30.8-21.821.8
Advanced Diploma/Diploma2.5-11.611.6
Certificate III/IV0.0-21.121.1
Year 120.8-18.118.1
Year 110.0-4.84.8
Year 10 and below0.0-12.512.5

A law degree or a degree in science or engineering is needed to work as an Intellectual Property Lawyer. A relevant postgraduate degree, such as a Masters of Intellectual Property Law may be useful.

Registration with the relevant state or territory board may be needed to work as an Intellectual Property Lawyer. Membership with the Intellectual Property Society of Australia and New Zealand may be useful.

Checks, licences and tickets

You may need:

  • national police check

Thinking about study or training?

Before starting a course, check it will provide you with the skills and qualifications you need.

  • Search and compare thousands of higher education courses, and their entry requirements from different institutions across Australia at Course Seeker website.
  • Compare undergraduate and postgraduate student experiences and outcomes on the QILT website.

Or check out related courses on Job Outlook.

Useful links and resources


The course listings on this page are provided by Good Education Group.

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  3. Customer and Personal Service

    74% Skill level

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  4. Administration and Management

    65% Skill level

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    62% Skill level

    Recruiting and training people, managing pay and other entitlements (like sick leave), and negotiating pay and conditions.

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The skills and importance ratings on this page are derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2, 23-1011.00 - Lawyers.

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    100% Important

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    100% Important

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  3. Telephone

    99% Important

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    98% Important

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    96% Important

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Occupational Information Network
O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.
The skills and importance ratings on this page are derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2, 23-1011.00 - Lawyers.

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