Pathology Collectors extract, collect, label and preserve blood and other specimens from patients for laboratory analysis.

Specialisations: Blood Collector.

You usually need a certificate III in pathology collection to work as a Pathology Collector. VET (Vocational Education and Training) and university are both common study pathways for Pathology Collectors.

Tasks

  • Greet donors.
  • Records donors' personal details, including their weight, age, blood type and contact details.
  • Explains the procedure to donors and checks their personal details.
  • Takes a finger-prick test to check the donor's haemoglobin (red blood cells) and ensure that iron levels in the blood are normal.
  • Takes blood from donors.
  • Informs donors of emergency medical contacts for potential side-effects of donating blood.
  • Cares for donors who may be feeling dizzy or have another adverse reaction.
  • Provides refreshments for donors, and ensures they absorb enough sugar back into their system.
  • Maintains machinery and orders supplies.
  • Advertises blood collection days.
  • Drives a blood bank collection vehicle.
  • Gives speeches about donating blood.

All Medical Technicians

  • $1,159 Weekly Pay
  • Stable Future Growth
  • Lower unemployment Unemployment

Pathology Collectors

  • 9,000 workers Employment Size
  • Medium skill Skill level rating
  • 41% Full-Time Full-Time Share
  • 40 hours Average full-time
  • 45 years Average age
  • 92% female Gender Share

The number of people working as Pathology Collectors (in their main job) grew very strongly over 5 years:
from 7,100 in 2011 to 9,000 in 2016.

  • Size: This is a small occupation.
  • Location: Pathology Collectors work in many regions of Australia.
  • Industries: Most work in the Health Care and Social Assistance industry.
  • Full-time: Less than half work full-time (41%, less than the average of 66%), showing there are many opportunities to work part-time.
  • Hours: Full-time workers spend around 40 hours per week at work (compared to the average of 44 hours).
  • Age: The average age is 45 years (compared to the average of 40 years). Many workers are 45 years or older (52%).
  • Gender: 92% of workers are female (compared to the average of 48%).

Employment Outlook

Number of Workers

No data is available for the selected graph for this Occupation.

Weekly Earnings

Weekly Earnings (Before Tax)

No data is available for the selected graph for this Occupation.

Main Industries

Main Employing Industries (% Share)

Source: Based on ABS Census 2016, Customised Report. Industries are based on the Australian and New Zealand Standard Industrial Classification (ANZSIC 06).
Main Employing IndustriesIndustry (% share)
Health Care and Social Assistance98.3
Professional, Scientific and Technical Services0.7
Public Administration and Safety0.4
Financial and Insurance Services0.1
Other Industries0.5

States and Territories

  • NSW

  • VIC

  • QLD

  • SA

  • TAS

  • NT

  • ACT

Employment by State and Territory (% Share)

Source: Based on Based on ABS Census 2016, Customised Report. Share of workers across Australian States and Territories, in this job compared to the all jobs average.
StatePathology CollectorsAll Jobs Average
NSW31.131.6
VIC25.825.6
QLD21.820.0
SA6.37.0
WA11.510.8
TAS1.62.0
NT0.51.0
ACT1.41.9

Age Profile

Age Profile (% Share)

Source: Based on Based on ABS Census 2016, Customised Report. Age profile of workers in this job compared to the all jobs average.
Age BracketPathology CollectorsAll Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
15-190.6-5.05.0
20-246.5-9.39.3
25-3418.7-22.922.9
35-4421.8-22.022.0
45-5427.4-21.621.6
55-5913.6-9.09.0
60-647.9-6.06.0
65 and Over3.5-4.24.2

Education Level

Highest Level of Education (% Share)

Source: ABS, ABS Census 2016, Customised Report. Highest qualification completed by workers in this job (in any field of study). Qualifications needed by new workers might be different from the qualifications of workers already in the job.
Type of QualificationPathology CollectorsAll Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
Post Graduate/Graduate Diploma or Graduate Certificate3.7-10.110.1
Bachelor degree17.7-21.821.8
Advanced Diploma/Diploma17.8-11.611.6
Certificate III/IV42.2-21.121.1
Year 1210.0-18.118.1
Year 112.1-4.84.8
Year 10 and below6.5-12.512.5

You usually need a certificate III in pathology collection to work as a Pathology Collector. VET (Vocational Education and Training) and university are both common study pathways for Pathology Collectors.

Thinking about study or training?

Before starting a course, check it will provide you with the skills and qualifications you need.

  • Search and compare thousands of higher education courses, and their entry requirements from different institutions across Australia at Course Seeker website.
  • Compare undergraduate and postgraduate student experiences and outcomes on the QILT website.
  • Compare Vocational Education and Training (VET) courses, providers and student outcomes on the My Skills website.
  • You might be interested in Health Industry and Laboratory Operations VET training pathways on the AAPathways website.

Or check out related courses on Job Outlook.

The course listings on this page are provided by Good Education Group.

Employers look for Medical Technicians who have good people skills, a high attention to detail and are accurate.

Filter Skills & Knowledge

Knowledge

These are important topics, subjects or knowledge areas.

  1. Customer and Personal Service

    72% Skill level

    Understanding customer needs, providing good quality service, and measuring customer satisfaction.

  2. Education and Training

    61% Skill level

    Curriculum and training design, teaching and instruction for individuals and groups, and the measurement of training effects.

  3. Clerical

    58% Skill level

    Word processing, managing files and records, stenography and transcription, designing forms, and other office work.

  4. English Language

    54% Skill level

    English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.

  5. Psychology

    52% Skill level

    Human behaviour; differences in ability, personality, and interests; learning and motivation; research methods; assessing and treating disorders.

Occupational Information Network
O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.
The skills and importance ratings on this page are derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2, 31-9097.00 - Phlebotomists.

Learn about the daily activities, and physical and social demands faced by workers. Explore the values and work styles that workers rate as most important.

Filter Work Environment

Demands

The physical and social demands workers face most often are shown below.

  1. Contact With Others

    98% Important

    How much do you have contact with people (face-to-face, by telephone, or any other way)?

  2. Being Exact or Accurate

    97% Important

    How important is being very exact or highly accurate?

  3. Exposed to Disease or Infections

    94% Important

    How often are you exposed to disease/infections?

  4. Wear Common Protective or Safety Equipment

    93% Important

    How often do you wear equipment like safety shoes, glasses, gloves, hard hats or life jackets?

  5. Face-to-Face Discussions

    93% Important

    How often do you talk with people face-to-face?

Occupational Information Network
O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.
The skills and importance ratings on this page are derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2, 31-9097.00 - Phlebotomists.

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