Metallurgical or Materials Technicians test materials as part of mineral and metal processing and refining, or for research into metals, ceramics, polymers and other materials in support of Metallurgists and Materials Engineers.

Specialisations: Dye Penetrant Testing Technician, Heat Treatment Technician, Magnetic Testing Technician, Metallurgy Laboratory Technician, Non-destructive Testing Technician, Petroleum Products Laboratory Technician, Petroleum Refinery Laboratory Technician, Pressure Testing Technician, Ultrasound Technician.

Either extensive experience or a certificate IV in manufacturing technology or another related field is needed to work as a Metallurgical or Materials Technician.

Tasks

  • Studies the properties of metals and other materials.
  • Develops and improves existing materials.
  • Develops new combinations of metals (alloy development) and creates products that combine metals with other materials.
  • Develops techniques to repair metal damage.
  • Advises engineers and manufacturers on industrial processes that use metals and the correct selection of metals for specific uses.
  • Checks the quality of metals or other materials used in new products.
  • Conducts quality tests and other tests to detect defects.
  • Uses ultrasonic, radiographic and other non-destructive testing methods.
  • Interprets results from radiographs, meters and other indicators.
  • Write evidence briefs for litigation cases and appear as an expert witness in court.

More about Other Building and Engineering Technicians

All Other Building and Engineering Technicians

  • $2,812 Weekly Pay
  • Stable Future Growth
  • Lower unemployment Unemployment

Metallurgical and Materials Technicians

  • 3,600 workers Employment Size
  • High skill Skill level rating
  • 88% Full-Time Full-Time Share
  • 50 hours Average full-time
  • 38 years Average age
  • 25% female Gender Share

The number of people working as Metallurgical and Materials Technicians (in their main job) fell over 5 years:
from 3,800 in 2011 to 3,600 in 2016.

  • Size: This is a very small occupation.
  • Location: Many Metallurgical and Materials Technicians work in Western Australia.
  • Industries: Most work in Professional, Scientific and Technical Services; Mining; and Manufacturing.
  • Full-time: Most work full-time (88%, much higher than the average of 66%).
  • Hours: Full-time workers spend around 50 hours per week at work (compared to the average of 44 hours).
  • Age: The average age is 38 years (compared to the average of 40 years).
  • Gender: 25% of workers are female (compared to the average of 48%).

Employment Outlook

Number of Workers

No data is available for the selected graph for this Occupation.

Weekly Earnings

Weekly Earnings (Before Tax)

No data is available for the selected graph for this Occupation.

Main Industries

Main Employing Industries (% Share)

Source: Based on ABS Census 2016, Customised Report. Industries are based on the Australian and New Zealand Standard Industrial Classification (ANZSIC 06).
Main Employing IndustriesIndustry (% share)
Professional, Scientific and Technical Services38.2
Mining33.3
Manufacturing16.0
Construction4.7
Other Industries7.8

States and Territories

  • NSW

  • VIC

  • QLD

  • SA

  • TAS

  • NT

  • ACT

Employment by State and Territory (% Share)

Source: Based on Based on ABS Census 2016, Customised Report. Share of workers across Australian States and Territories, in this job compared to the all jobs average.
StateMetallurgical and Materials TechniciansAll Jobs Average
NSW13.731.6
VIC10.225.6
QLD21.320.0
SA7.47.0
WA43.510.8
TAS1.62.0
NT2.11.0
ACT0.21.9

Age Profile

Age Profile (% Share)

Source: Based on Based on ABS Census 2016, Customised Report. Age profile of workers in this job compared to the all jobs average.
Age BracketMetallurgical and Materials TechniciansAll Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
15-191.0-5.05.0
20-247.4-9.39.3
25-3431.7-22.922.9
35-4423.8-22.022.0
45-5422.6-21.621.6
55-598.3-9.09.0
60-643.6-6.06.0
65 and Over1.7-4.24.2

Education Level

Highest Level of Education (% Share)

Source: ABS, ABS Census 2016, Customised Report. Highest qualification completed by workers in this job (in any field of study). Qualifications needed by new workers might be different from the qualifications of workers already in the job.
Type of QualificationMetallurgical and Materials TechniciansAll Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
Post Graduate/Graduate Diploma or Graduate Certificate3.9-10.110.1
Bachelor degree17.7-21.821.8
Advanced Diploma/Diploma19.6-11.611.6
Certificate III/IV30.2-21.121.1
Year 1216.5-18.118.1
Year 113.8-4.84.8
Year 10 and below8.2-12.512.5

Either extensive experience or a certificate IV in manufacturing technology or another related field is needed to work as a Metallurgical or Materials Technician.

Registration with the relevant state or territory board may be needed to work as a Metallurgical or Materials Technician.

Checks, licences and tickets

You may need:

  • non-destructive testing certification
  • national police check

Thinking about study or training?

Before starting a course, check it will provide you with the skills and qualifications you need.

  • Compare Vocational Education and Training (VET) courses, providers and student outcomes on the My Skills website.
  • You might be interested in Metal and Engineering and Resources and Infrastructure Industry VET training pathways on the AAPathways website.

Or check out related courses on Job Outlook.

Useful links and resources


The course listings on this page are provided by Good Education Group.

Employers look for Building and Engineering Technicians who are hardworking, motivated and can multitask under pressure.

Filter Skills & Knowledge

Knowledge

These are important topics, subjects or knowledge areas.

  1. Engineering and Technology

    87% Skill level

    The use engineering science and technology to design and produce goods and services.

  2. Chemistry

    82% Skill level

    Chemical composition, structure, and properties. How chemicals are made, used, mixed, and can change.

  3. Physics

    78% Skill level

    The physical laws of matter, motion and energy, and how they interact through space and time.

  4. Mathematics

    78% Skill level

    Arithmetic, algebra, geometry, calculus, or statistics.

  5. Production and Processing

    71% Skill level

    Raw materials, production processes, quality control, costs, and ways of making and distributing goods.

Occupational Information Network
O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.
The skills and importance ratings on this page are derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2, 17-2131.00 - Materials Engineers.

Learn about the daily activities, and physical and social demands faced by workers. Explore the values and work styles that workers rate as most important.

Filter Work Environment

Demands

The physical and social demands workers face most often are shown below.

  1. Electronic Mail

    100% Important

    How often do you use electronic mail?

  2. Telephone

    92% Important

    How often do you talk on the telephone?

  3. Face-to-Face Discussions

    92% Important

    How often do you talk with people face-to-face?

  4. Indoors, Heat Controlled

    92% Important

    How often do you work indoors with access to heating or cooling?

  5. Work With Work Group or Team

    85% Important

    How important is it to work with others in a group or team?

Occupational Information Network
O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.
The skills and importance ratings on this page are derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2, 17-2131.00 - Materials Engineers.

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