Business Machine Mechanics install, maintain and repair electronic business equipment such as multi-function devices, photocopiers, scanners, fax machines and cash registers.

Also known as: Office Equipment Technician or Office Machine Technician.

Specialisations: Photocopier Technician.

Either extensive experience or a certificate III in engineering mechanical trade is needed to work as a Business Machine Mechanic. Traineeships may be available.

Tasks

  • Examines and tests machines, equipment, instruments and control systems to diagnose faults.
  • Adjusts, repairs and replaces worn or defective parts and wiring to maintain machines, equipment and instruments.
  • Reassembles, test operates and adjusts equipment.
  • Advises users of correct operating procedures to prevent malfunctions.
  • Monitors radio traffic as well as transmitting and receiving voice messages.
  • Installs electronic instruments and control systems.
  • Applies knowledge of electrical, electronic, mechanical, hydraulic and pneumatic principles in commissioning and maintaining control systems.

All Electronics Trades Workers

  • $1,348 Weekly Pay
  • Decline Future Growth
  • Average unemployment Unemployment

Business Machine Mechanics

  • 2,600 workers Employment Size
  • Medium skill Skill level rating
  • 91% Full-Time Full-Time Share
  • 41 hours Average full-time
  • 46 years Average age
  • 3% female Gender Share

The number of people working as Business Machine Mechanics (in their main job) fell over 5 years:
from 2,900 in 2011 to 2,600 in 2016.

  • Size: This is a very small occupation.
  • Location: Business Machine Mechanics work in many regions of Australia.
  • Industries: Most work in Wholesale Trade; Other Services; and Manufacturing.
  • Full-time: Most work full-time (91%, much higher than the average of 66%).
  • Hours: Full-time workers spend around 41 hours per week at work (compared to the average of 44 hours).
  • Age: The average age is 46 years (compared to the average of 40 years). Many workers are 45 years or older (53%).
  • Gender: 3% of workers are female (compared to the average of 48%).

Employment Outlook

Number of Workers

No data is available for the selected graph for this Occupation.

Weekly Earnings

Weekly Earnings (Before Tax)

No data is available for the selected graph for this Occupation.

Main Industries

Main Employing Industries (% Share)

Source: Based on ABS Census 2016, Customised Report. Industries are based on the Australian and New Zealand Standard Industrial Classification (ANZSIC 06).
Main Employing IndustriesIndustry (% share)
Wholesale Trade42.7
Other Services27.7
Manufacturing10.7
Retail Trade6.4
Other Industries12.5

States and Territories

  • NSW

  • VIC

  • QLD

  • SA

  • TAS

  • NT

  • ACT

Employment by State and Territory (% Share)

Source: Based on Based on ABS Census 2016, Customised Report. Share of workers across Australian States and Territories, in this job compared to the all jobs average.
StateBusiness Machine MechanicsAll Jobs Average
NSW34.731.6
VIC26.125.6
QLD19.120.0
SA5.67.0
WA10.010.8
TAS1.42.0
NT1.01.0
ACT2.01.9

Age Profile

Age Profile (% Share)

Source: Based on Based on ABS Census 2016, Customised Report. Age profile of workers in this job compared to the all jobs average.
Age BracketBusiness Machine MechanicsAll Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
15-191.0-5.05.0
20-245.4-9.39.3
25-3416.7-22.922.9
35-4424.3-22.022.0
45-5430.2-21.621.6
55-5911.8-9.09.0
60-646.8-6.06.0
65 and Over3.8-4.24.2

Education Level

Highest Level of Education (% Share)

Source: ABS, ABS Census 2016, Customised Report. Highest qualification completed by workers in this job (in any field of study). Qualifications needed by new workers might be different from the qualifications of workers already in the job.
Type of QualificationBusiness Machine MechanicsAll Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
Post Graduate/Graduate Diploma or Graduate Certificate2.0-10.110.1
Bachelor degree9.4-21.821.8
Advanced Diploma/Diploma16.2-11.611.6
Certificate III/IV41.1-21.121.1
Year 1219.9-18.118.1
Year 114.3-4.84.8
Year 10 and below7.2-12.512.5

Either extensive experience or a certificate III in engineering mechanical trade is needed to work as a Business Machine Mechanic. Traineeships may be available.

Thinking about study or training?

Before starting a course, check it will provide you with the skills and qualifications you need.

  • Compare Vocational Education and Training (VET) courses, providers and student outcomes on the My Skills website.
  • You might be interested in Electrotechnology VET training pathways on the AAPathways website.

Or check out related courses on Job Outlook.

Useful links and resources


The course listings on this page are provided by Good Education Group.

Employers look for Electronics Trades Workers who are reliable, work well in a team and have a strong work ethic.

Filter Skills & Knowledge

Knowledge

These are important topics, subjects or knowledge areas.

  1. Computers and Electronics

    76% Skill level

    Circuit boards, processors, chips, electronic equipment, and computer hardware and software, including applications and programming.

  2. Customer and Personal Service

    56% Skill level

    Understanding customer needs, providing good quality service, and measuring customer satisfaction.

  3. Mechanical

    55% Skill level

    Machines and tools, including their designs, uses, repair, and maintenance.

  4. Engineering and Technology

    48% Skill level

    The use engineering science and technology to design and produce goods and services.

  5. English Language

    37% Skill level

    English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.

Occupational Information Network
O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.
The skills and importance ratings on this page are derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2, 49-2011.00 - Computer, Automated Teller, and Office Machine Repairers.

Learn about the daily activities, and physical and social demands faced by workers. Explore the values and work styles that workers rate as most important.

Filter Work Environment

Demands

The physical and social demands workers face most often are shown below.

  1. Telephone

    99% Important

    How often do you talk on the telephone?

  2. Freedom to Make Decisions

    91% Important

    How much freedom do you have to make decision on your own?

  3. Electronic Mail

    90% Important

    How often do you use electronic mail?

  4. Indoors, Heat Controlled

    89% Important

    How often do you work indoors with access to heating or cooling?

  5. Structured versus Unstructured Work

    88% Important

    How much freedom do you have to decide on tasks, priorities, and goals?

Occupational Information Network
O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.
The skills and importance ratings on this page are derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2, 49-2011.00 - Computer, Automated Teller, and Office Machine Repairers.

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