Jewellers make and repair jewellery such as rings, brooches, chains and bracelets, craft objects out of precious metals, and cut, shape and polish rough gemstones to produce fashion and industrial jewels.

Specialisations: Diamond Cutter, Faceter, Gem Setter, Goldsmith, Lapidary, Opal Polisher, Ring Maker, Silversmith.

You can work as a Jeweller without formal qualifications, however, they may be useful. VET (Vocational Education and Training) and university are both common study pathways for Jewellers.

Tasks

  • examining designs and specifications for jewellery and precious metal objects
  • shaping moulded metal by cutting, filing, beating, turning and bending, using specialised hand and power tools
  • assembling articles by soldering, screwing, riveting and otherwise joining
  • securing precious stones in retaining prongs and ridges, and smoothing and checking final settings
  • engraving designs on ring settings, brooches, bracelets and other articles
  • repairing jewellery by soldering, replacing and rebuilding worn and broken parts
  • appraising the quality and value of jewellery
  • cutting and dividing stones to approximate final shape, using precision hand and power tools and jigs
  • securing stones and shapes, cutting angles, smoothing and polishing
  • finishing articles using files, emery paper and buffing machines
  • restyling old jewellery

All Jewellers

  • Unavailable Weekly Pay
  • Moderate Future Growth
  • Lower unemployment Unemployment
  • 5,800 workers Employment Size
  • Medium skill Skill level rating
  • 67% Full-Time Full-Time Share
  • 45 hours Average full-time
  • 47 years Average age
  • 34% female Gender Share

The number of people working as Jewellers (in their main job) grew very strongly over the past 5 years and is expected to grow over the next 5 years:
from 5,800 in 2018 to 6,000 by 2023.
Job openings can come from new jobs being created, but most come from turnover (workers leaving).
There are likely to be around 3,000 job openings over 5 years (that's about 600 a year).

  • Size: This is a small occupation.
  • Unemployment: Unemployment was below average in 2018.
  • Location: Jewellers work in many regions of Australia.
  • Industries: Most work in Retail Trade; Manufacturing; and Other Services.
  • Full-time: Many work full-time (67%, similar to the average of 66%).
  • Hours: Full-time workers spend around 45 hours per week at work (compared to the average of 44 hours).
  • Age: The average age is 47 years (compared to the average of 40 years). Many workers are 45 years or older (55%).
  • Gender: 34% of workers are female (compared to the average of 48%).

Employment Outlook

Number of Workers

Source: ABS Labour Force Survey, Department of Jobs and Small Business trend data to May 2018 and Department of Jobs and Small Business projections to 2023.
YearNumber of Workers
20085400
20095400
20104100
20116400
20124700
20133500
20144800
20153800
20164700
20175300
20185800
20236000

Weekly Earnings

Weekly Earnings (Before Tax)

No data is available for the selected graph for this Occupation.

Main Industries

Main Employing Industries (% Share)

Source: Based on ABS Census 2016, Customised Report. Industries are based on the Australian and New Zealand Standard Industrial Classification (ANZSIC 06).
Main Employing IndustriesIndustry (% share)
Retail Trade43.9
Manufacturing41.0
Other Services5.4
Professional, Scientific and Technical Services5.3
Other Industries4.4

States and Territories

  • NSW

  • VIC

  • QLD

  • SA

  • TAS

  • NT

  • ACT

Employment by State and Territory (% Share)

Source: Based on ABS Census 2016, Customised Report. Share of workers across Australian States and Territories, in this job compared to the all jobs average.
StateJewellersAll Jobs Average
NSW33.631.6
VIC25.825.6
QLD18.820.0
SA7.87.0
WA9.410.8
TAS2.82.0
NT0.81.0
ACT1.11.9

Age Profile

Age Profile (% Share)

Source: Based on ABS Census 2016, Customised Report. Age profile of workers in this job compared to the all jobs average.
Age BracketJewellersAll Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
15-191.2-5.05.0
20-244.6-9.39.3
25-3416.0-22.922.9
35-4423.3-22.022.0
45-5425.0-21.621.6
55-5911.9-9.09.0
60-649.7-6.06.0
65 and Over8.3-4.24.2

Education Level

Highest Level of Education (% Share)

Source: ABS Census 2016, Customised Report. Highest qualification completed by workers in this job (in any field of study). Qualifications needed by new workers might be different from the qualifications of workers already in the job.
Type of QualificationJewellersAll Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
Post Graduate/Graduate Diploma or Graduate Certificate2.6-10.110.1
Bachelor degree11.7-21.821.8
Advanced Diploma/Diploma12.5-11.611.6
Certificate III/IV43.4-21.121.1
Year 1213.7-18.118.1
Year 113.0-4.84.8
Year 10 and below13.1-12.512.5

You can work as a Jeweller without formal qualifications, however, they may be useful. VET (Vocational Education and Training) and university are both common study pathways for Jewellers.

Membership with the Jewellers Associate of Australia may be useful.

Thinking about study or training?

Before starting a course, check it will provide you with the skills and qualifications you need.

  • Search and compare thousands of higher education courses, and their entry requirements from different institutions across Australia at Course Seeker website.
  • Compare undergraduate and postgraduate student experiences and outcomes on the QILT website.
  • Compare Vocational Education and Training (VET) courses, providers and student outcomes on the My Skills website.
  • You might be interested in Metal and Engineering VET training pathways on the AAPathways website.

Or check out related courses on Job Outlook.

Useful links and resources


The course listings on this page are provided by Good Education Group.

Employers look for Jewellers who provide good customer service and have strong interpersonal skills.

Filter Skills & Knowledge

Knowledge

These are important topics, subjects or knowledge areas.

  1. Customer and Personal Service

    61% Skill level

    Understanding customer needs, providing good quality service, and measuring customer satisfaction.

  2. Production and Processing

    54% Skill level

    Raw materials, production processes, quality control, costs, and ways of making and distributing goods.

  3. Design

    53% Skill level

    Design techniques, tools, and principles used to make detailed technical plans, blueprints, drawings, and models.

  4. Sales and Marketing

    53% Skill level

    Showing, promoting, and selling including marketing strategy, product demonstration, sales techniques, and sales control systems.

  5. Mechanical

    51% Skill level

    Machines and tools, including their designs, uses, repair, and maintenance.

Occupational Information Network
O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.
The skills and importance ratings on this page are derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2, 51-9071.01 - Jewelers.

Learn about the daily activities, and physical and social demands faced by workers. Explore the values and work styles that workers rate as most important.

Filter Work Environment

Demands

The physical and social demands workers face most often are shown below.

  1. Spend Time Using Your Hands to Handle, Control, or Feel

    97% Important

    How much time do you spend using your hands to handle, control, or feel objects, tools or controls?

  2. Indoors, Heat Controlled

    96% Important

    How often do you work indoors with access to heating or cooling?

  3. Being Exact or Accurate

    92% Important

    How important is being very exact or highly accurate?

  4. Face-to-Face Discussions

    92% Important

    How often do you talk with people face-to-face?

  5. Telephone

    92% Important

    How often do you talk on the telephone?

Occupational Information Network
O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.
The skills and importance ratings on this page are derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2, 51-9071.01 - Jewelers.

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