Dental Technicians construct and repair dentures and other dental appliances.

Specialisations: Dental Laboratory Assistant.

A diploma in dental technology is needed to work as a Dental Technician. Traineeships may be available.

Tasks

  • Dental technicians work from a mould of a client's mouth made by a dentist or a clinical dental technician, and custom-make a wide range of appliances for the mouth, including: removable partial dentures.
  • Crowns (covers for broken or damaged teeth).
  • Dentures.
  • Removable orthodontic appliances (plates with wires to straighten teeth).
  • Mouthguards.
  • Splints for broken or cracked jawbones.
  • Anti-snoring devices.
  • Teeth whitening trays. clinical dental technicians: assess oral tissue.
  • Recognise abnormal conditions of the mouth.
  • Take impressions of teeth.
  • Make partial dentures, full dentures and other oral devices.
  • Reline dentures that are ill-fitting.

More about Dental Hygienists, Technicians and Therapists

All Dental Hygienists, Technicians and Therapists

  • Unavailable Weekly Pay
  • Stable Future Growth
  • Lower unemployment Unemployment

Dental Technicians

  • 2,700 workers Employment Size
  • High skill Skill level rating
  • 75% Full-Time Full-Time Share
  • 43 hours Average full-time
  • 40 years Average age
  • 36% female Gender Share

The number of people working as Dental Technicians (in their main job) fell over 5 years:
from 2,900 in 2011 to 2,700 in 2016.

  • Size: This is a very small occupation.
  • Location: Dental Technicians work in many regions of Australia.
  • Industries: Most work in Manufacturing; Health Care and Social Assistance; and Public Administration and Safety.
  • Full-time: Many work full-time (75%, higher than the average of 66%).
  • Hours: Full-time workers spend around 43 hours per week at work (compared to the average of 44 hours).
  • Age: The average age is 40 years (compared to the average of 40 years).
  • Gender: 36% of workers are female (compared to the average of 48%).

Employment Outlook

Number of Workers

No data is available for the selected graph for this Occupation.

Weekly Earnings

Weekly Earnings (Before Tax)

No data is available for the selected graph for this Occupation.

Main Industries

Main Employing Industries (% Share)

Source: Based on ABS Census 2016, Customised Report. Industries are based on the Australian and New Zealand Standard Industrial Classification (ANZSIC 06).
Main Employing IndustriesIndustry (% share)
Manufacturing65.6
Health Care and Social Assistance30.4
Public Administration and Safety0.9
Other Services0.7
Other Industries2.4

States and Territories

  • NSW

  • VIC

  • QLD

  • SA

  • TAS

  • NT

  • ACT

Employment by State and Territory (% Share)

Source: Based on Based on ABS Census 2016, Customised Report. Share of workers across Australian States and Territories, in this job compared to the all jobs average.
StateDental TechniciansAll Jobs Average
NSW27.531.6
VIC25.925.6
QLD20.720.0
SA7.27.0
WA15.610.8
TAS1.32.0
NT0.41.0
ACT1.41.9

Age Profile

Age Profile (% Share)

Source: Based on Based on ABS Census 2016, Customised Report. Age profile of workers in this job compared to the all jobs average.
Age BracketDental TechniciansAll Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
15-191.0-5.05.0
20-247.5-9.39.3
25-3427.0-22.922.9
35-4425.8-22.022.0
45-5418.9-21.621.6
55-5910.1-9.09.0
60-645.6-6.06.0
65 and Over4.1-4.24.2

Education Level

Highest Level of Education (% Share)

Source: ABS, ABS Census 2016, Customised Report. Highest qualification completed by workers in this job (in any field of study). Qualifications needed by new workers might be different from the qualifications of workers already in the job.
Type of QualificationDental TechniciansAll Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
Post Graduate/Graduate Diploma or Graduate Certificate1.2-10.110.1
Bachelor degree13.6-21.821.8
Advanced Diploma/Diploma47.5-11.611.6
Certificate III/IV28.6-21.121.1
Year 126.8-18.118.1
Year 110.9-4.84.8
Year 10 and below1.4-12.512.5

A diploma in dental technology is needed to work as a Dental Technician. Traineeships may be available.

Checks, licences and tickets

You may need:

  • driver's licence
  • national police check
  • working with children check
  • first aid certificate
  • Psychometric or aptitude tests

Thinking about study or training?

Before starting a course, check it will provide you with the skills and qualifications you need.

  • Search and compare thousands of higher education courses, and their entry requirements from different institutions across Australia at Course Seeker website.
  • Compare undergraduate and postgraduate student experiences and outcomes on the QILT website.
  • Compare Vocational Education and Training (VET) courses, providers and student outcomes on the My Skills website.
  • You might be interested in Health Industry VET training pathways on the AAPathways website.

Or check out related courses on Job Outlook.

Useful links and resources


The course listings on this page are provided by Good Education Group.

Employers look for Dental Hygienists, Technicians and Therapists who are caring, compassionate and empathetic and can communicate clearly with a diverse range of people.

Filter Skills & Knowledge

Knowledge

These are important topics, subjects or knowledge areas.

  1. Production and Processing

    67% Skill level

    Raw materials, production processes, quality control, costs, and ways of making and distributing goods.

  2. Design

    66% Skill level

    Design techniques, tools, and principles used to make detailed technical plans, blueprints, drawings, and models.

  3. Medicine and Dentistry

    63% Skill level

    Diagnose and treat human injuries, diseases, and deformities, including preventive health-care measures.

  4. Engineering and Technology

    60% Skill level

    The use engineering science and technology to design and produce goods and services.

  5. Customer and Personal Service

    58% Skill level

    Understanding customer needs, providing good quality service, and measuring customer satisfaction.

Occupational Information Network
O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.
The skills and importance ratings on this page are derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2, 51-9081.00 - Dental Laboratory Technicians.

Learn about the daily activities, and physical and social demands faced by workers. Explore the values and work styles that workers rate as most important.

Filter Work Environment

Demands

The physical and social demands workers face most often are shown below.

  1. Exposed to Contaminants

    99% Important

    How often are you exposed to pollutants, gases, dust or odours?

  2. Indoors, Heat Controlled

    98% Important

    How often do you work indoors with access to heating or cooling?

  3. Time Pressure

    97% Important

    How often does this job require the worker to meet strict deadlines?

  4. Spend Time Using Your Hands to Handle, Control, or Feel

    97% Important

    How much time do you spend using your hands to handle, control, or feel objects, tools or controls?

  5. Being Exact or Accurate

    96% Important

    How important is being very exact or highly accurate?

Occupational Information Network
O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.
The skills and importance ratings on this page are derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2, 51-9081.00 - Dental Laboratory Technicians.

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