Nannies assist parents in the provision of ongoing care and supervision for babies and children, usually in the child's home.

    You can work as a Nanny without formal qualifications, however, they may be useful. A course in early childhood education and care might be helpful.

    Tasks

    • Assists in the preparation of materials and equipment for children's education and recreational activities.
    • Manages children's behaviour and guides children's social development.
    • Prepares and conducts activities for children.
    • Entertains children by reading and playing games.
    • Supervises children in recreational activities.
    • Supervises the daily routine of children.
    • Supervises the hygiene of children.

    All Child Carers

    • $953 Weekly Pay
    • Very strong Future Growth
    • Average unemployment Unemployment

    Nannies

    • 8,500 workers Employment Size
    • Lower skill Skill level rating
    • 23% Full-Time Full-Time Share
    • 43 hours Average full-time
    • 25 years Average age
    • 97% female Gender Share

    The number of people working as Nannies (in their main job) grew very strongly over 5 years:
    from 6,500 in 2011 to 8,500 in 2016.

    • Size: This is a small occupation.
    • Location: Nannies work in many regions of Australia.
    • Industries: Most work in Other Services; Health Care and Social Assistance; and Administrative and Support Services.
    • Full-time: Less than half work full-time (23%, less than the average of 66%), showing there are many opportunities to work part-time.
    • Hours: Full-time workers spend around 43 hours per week at work (compared to the average of 44 hours).
    • Age: The average age is 25 years (compared to the average of 40 years). Many workers are under 25 years of age (47%).
    • Gender: 97% of workers are female (compared to the average of 48%).

    Employment Outlook

    Number of Workers

    No data is available for the selected graph for this Occupation.

    Weekly Earnings

    Weekly Earnings (Before Tax)

    No data is available for the selected graph for this Occupation.

    Main Industries

    Main Employing Industries (% Share)

    Source: Based on ABS Census 2016, Customised Report. Industries are based on the Australian and New Zealand Standard Industrial Classification (ANZSIC 06).
    Main Employing IndustriesIndustry (% share)
    Other Services55.6
    Health Care and Social Assistance24.2
    Administrative and Support Services4.4
    Education and Training4.1
    Other Industries11.7

    States and Territories

    • NSW

    • VIC

    • QLD

    • SA

    • TAS

    • NT

    • ACT

    Employment by State and Territory (% Share)

    Source: Based on Based on ABS Census 2016, Customised Report. Share of workers across Australian States and Territories, in this job compared to the all jobs average.
    StateNanniesAll Jobs Average
    NSW37.331.6
    VIC27.125.6
    QLD18.120.0
    SA5.17.0
    WA8.910.8
    TAS0.82.0
    NT0.61.0
    ACT2.11.9

    Age Profile

    Age Profile (% Share)

    Source: Based on Based on ABS Census 2016, Customised Report. Age profile of workers in this job compared to the all jobs average.
    Age BracketNanniesAll Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
    15-1919.1-5.05.0
    20-2427.9-9.39.3
    25-3423.0-22.922.9
    35-449.7-22.022.0
    45-549.0-21.621.6
    55-595.0-9.09.0
    60-643.9-6.06.0
    65 and Over2.5-4.24.2

    Education Level

    Highest Level of Education (% Share)

    Source: ABS, ABS Census 2016, Customised Report. Highest qualification completed by workers in this job (in any field of study). Qualifications needed by new workers might be different from the qualifications of workers already in the job.
    Type of QualificationNanniesAll Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
    Post Graduate/Graduate Diploma or Graduate Certificate3.3-10.110.1
    Bachelor degree14.6-21.821.8
    Advanced Diploma/Diploma13.5-11.611.6
    Certificate III/IV14.7-21.121.1
    Year 1238.3-18.118.1
    Year 114.9-4.84.8
    Year 10 and below10.7-12.512.5

    You can work as a Nanny without formal qualifications, however, they may be useful. A course in early childhood education and care might be helpful.

    Checks, licences and tickets

    You may need:

    • working with children check
    • first aid certificate
    • CPR certificate
    • training in anaphylaxis and/or asthma management

    Thinking about study or training?

    Before starting a course, check it will provide you with the skills and qualifications you need.

    • Compare Vocational Education and Training (VET) courses, providers and student outcomes on the My Skills website.
    • You might be interested in Community Services VET training pathways on the AAPathways website.

    Or check out related courses on Job Outlook.

    Useful links and resources


    The course listings on this page are provided by Good Education Group.

    Employers look for Child Carers who are caring, compassionate, empathetic, and interact well with others.

    Filter Skills & Knowledge

    Knowledge

    These are important topics, subjects or knowledge areas.

    1. Psychology

      48% Skill level

      Human behaviour; differences in ability, personality, and interests; learning and motivation; research methods; assessing and treating disorders.

    2. English Language

      46% Skill level

      English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.

    3. Customer and Personal Service

      45% Skill level

      Understanding customer needs, providing good quality service, and measuring customer satisfaction.

    4. Education and Training

      43% Skill level

      Curriculum and training design, teaching and instruction for individuals and groups, and the measurement of training effects.

    5. Geography

      41% Skill level

      Describing land, sea, and air, including their physical characteristics, locations, how they work together, and the location of plant, animal, and human life.

    Occupational Information Network
    O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.
    The skills and importance ratings on this page are derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2, 39-9011.01 - Nannies.

    Learn about the daily activities, and physical and social demands faced by workers. Explore the values and work styles that workers rate as most important.

    Filter Work Environment

    Demands

    The physical and social demands workers face most often are shown below.

    1. Face-to-Face Discussions

      96% Important

      How often do you talk with people face-to-face?

    2. Freedom to Make Decisions

      95% Important

      How much freedom do you have to make decision on your own?

    3. Telephone

      95% Important

      How often do you talk on the telephone?

    4. In an Enclosed Vehicle or Equipment

      86% Important

      How often do you work in a closed vehicle (e.g., car)?

    5. Physical Proximity

      84% Important

      How physically close are you to other people?

    Occupational Information Network
    O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.
    The skills and importance ratings on this page are derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2, 39-9011.01 - Nannies.

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