Golfers play golf professionally in tournaments, or as a resident professional, and organise golf-related activities.

    You can work as a Golfer without formal qualifications, however, a high level of skill is required. Trainee programs, that result in a VET (Vocational Education and Training) qualification, may be available.

    Tasks

    • Maintains a high degree of expertise in golf.
    • Attends regular practice sessions and undertakes private training to maintain the required standard of fitness.
    • Decides on strategies in consultation with coaches.
    • Assesses other competitors and conditions at venues.
    • Competes in golfing events.
    • Adheres to the rules and regulations associated with golf.
    • Undertakes sports promotional activities and television appearances.

    All Sportspersons

    • $1,548 Weekly Pay
    • Very strong Future Growth
    • Lower unemployment Unemployment

    Golfers

    • 1,000 workers Employment Size
    • Medium skill Skill level rating
    • 78% Full-Time Full-Time Share
    • 46 hours Average full-time
    • 39 years Average age
    • 8% female Gender Share

    The number of people working as Golfers (in their main job) stayed about the same over 5 years:
    from 1,100 in 2011 to 1,000 in 2016.

    • Size: This is a very small occupation.
    • Location: Golfers work in many parts of Australia. New South Wales has a large share of workers.
    • Industries: Most work in Arts and Recreation Services; Education and Training; and Accommodation and Food Services.
    • Full-time: Many work full-time (78%, higher than the average of 66%).
    • Hours: Full-time workers spend around 46 hours per week at work (compared to the average of 44 hours).
    • Age: The average age is 39 years (compared to the average of 40 years).
    • Gender: 8% of workers are female (compared to the average of 48%).

    Employment Outlook

    Number of Workers

    No data is available for the selected graph for this Occupation.

    Weekly Earnings

    Weekly Earnings (Before Tax)

    No data is available for the selected graph for this Occupation.

    Main Industries

    Main Employing Industries (% Share)

    Source: Based on ABS Census 2016, Customised Report. Industries are based on the Australian and New Zealand Standard Industrial Classification (ANZSIC 06).
    Main Employing IndustriesIndustry (% share)
    Arts and Recreation Services48.5
    Education and Training24.9
    Accommodation and Food Services13.6
    Retail Trade11.1
    Other Industries1.9

    States and Territories

    • NSW

    • VIC

    • QLD

    • SA

    • TAS

    • NT

    • ACT

    Employment by State and Territory (% Share)

    Source: Based on Based on ABS Census 2016, Customised Report. Share of workers across Australian States and Territories, in this job compared to the all jobs average.
    StateGolfersAll Jobs Average
    NSW37.731.6
    VIC23.825.6
    QLD22.120.0
    SA4.07.0
    WA8.610.8
    TAS1.12.0
    NT0.51.0
    ACT2.11.9

    Age Profile

    Age Profile (% Share)

    Source: Based on Based on ABS Census 2016, Customised Report. Age profile of workers in this job compared to the all jobs average.
    Age BracketGolfersAll Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
    15-191.1-5.05.0
    20-2412.3-9.39.3
    25-3427.0-22.922.9
    35-4425.8-22.022.0
    45-5420.4-21.621.6
    55-597.1-9.09.0
    60-643.8-6.06.0
    65 and Over2.4-4.24.2

    Education Level

    Highest Level of Education (% Share)

    Source: ABS, ABS Census 2016, Customised Report. Highest qualification completed by workers in this job (in any field of study). Qualifications needed by new workers might be different from the qualifications of workers already in the job.
    Type of QualificationGolfersAll Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
    Post Graduate/Graduate Diploma or Graduate Certificate0.0-10.110.1
    Bachelor degree14.1-21.821.8
    Advanced Diploma/Diploma39.7-11.611.6
    Certificate III/IV13.1-21.121.1
    Year 1226.1-18.118.1
    Year 112.7-4.84.8
    Year 10 and below4.1-12.512.5

    You can work as a Golfer without formal qualifications, however, a high level of skill is required. Trainee programs, that result in a VET (Vocational Education and Training) qualification, may be available.

    Thinking about study or training?

    Before starting a course, check it will provide you with the skills and qualifications you need.

    • Compare Vocational Education and Training (VET) courses, providers and student outcomes on the My Skills website.
    • You might be interested in Sport, Fitness and Recreation VET training pathways on the AAPathways website.

    Or check out related courses on Job Outlook.

    Useful links and resources


    The course listings on this page are provided by Good Education Group.

    Employers look for Sportspersons who are motivated, have a positive attitude and have a strong work ethic.

    Filter Skills & Knowledge

    Knowledge

    These are important topics, subjects or knowledge areas.

    1. Customer and Personal Service

      62% Skill level

      Understanding customer needs, providing good quality service, and measuring customer satisfaction.

    2. Personnel and Human Resources

      60% Skill level

      Recruiting and training people, managing pay and other entitlements (like sick leave), and negotiating pay and conditions.

    3. Education and Training

      56% Skill level

      Curriculum and training design, teaching and instruction for individuals and groups, and the measurement of training effects.

    4. Administration and Management

      53% Skill level

      Business principles involved in strategic planning, leadership, and coordinating people and resources.

    5. Sales and Marketing

      53% Skill level

      Showing, promoting, and selling including marketing strategy, product demonstration, sales techniques, and sales control systems.

    Occupational Information Network
    O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.
    The skills and importance ratings on this page are derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2, 27-2021.00 - Athletes and Sports Competitors.

    Learn about the daily activities, and physical and social demands faced by workers. Explore the values and work styles that workers rate as most important.

    Filter Work Environment

    Demands

    The physical and social demands workers face most often are shown below.

    1. Face-to-Face Discussions

      95% Important

      How often do you talk with people face-to-face?

    2. Work With Work Group or Team

      89% Important

      How important is it to work with others in a group or team?

    3. Level of Competition

      89% Important

      To what extent does this job require the worker to compete or to be aware of competitive pressures?

    4. Contact With Others

      86% Important

      How much do you have contact with people (face-to-face, by telephone, or any other way)?

    5. Impact of Decisions

      84% Important

      What results do your decisions have on other people?

    Occupational Information Network
    O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.
    The skills and importance ratings on this page are derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2, 27-2021.00 - Athletes and Sports Competitors.

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