Accounting Clerks monitor creditor and debtor accounts, undertake related routine documentation, and calculate and investigate the cost of wages, materials, overheads and other operating costs.

    You can work as an Accounting Clerk without formal qualifications, however, they may be useful. VET (Vocational Education and Training) and university are both common study pathways for Accounting Clerks.

    Tasks

    • preparing and processing documentation related to accounts payable and receivable
    • reconciling invoices and despatching payments
    • calculating, analysing and investigating the costs of proposed expenditure, wages and standard costs
    • preparing bank reconciliations
    • allocating expenditure to specified budget accounts
    • summarising expenditure and receipts
    • preparing records of standard costs and values for items such as raw materials and packaging supplies
    • recording cost variations and contract price movements
    • compiling cost data for preparation of operating budgets, and profit and loss calculations
    • investigating the costs of proposed expenditures, quotations and estimates
    • preparing reports of total costs, inventory adjustments, selling prices and profits
    • may work in a call centre

    More about Accounting Clerks

    All Accounting Clerks

    All Accounting Clerks

    • $1,190 Weekly Pay
    • Stable Future Growth
    • Lower unemployment Unemployment
    • 135,900 workers Employment Size
    • Lower skill Skill level rating
    • 66% Full-Time Full-Time Share
    • 41 hours Average full-time
    • 44 years Average age
    • 81% female Gender Share

    The number of people working as Accounting Clerks (in their main job) fell over the past 5 years and is expected to stay about the same over the next 5 years:
    from 135,900 in 2018 to 134,300 by 2023.
    Job openings can come from new jobs being created, but most come from turnover (workers leaving).
    There are likely to be around 53,000 job openings over 5 years (that's about 10,600 a year).

    • Size: This is a very large occupation.
    • Unemployment: Unemployment was below average in 2018.
    • Location: Accounting Clerks work in many regions of Australia.
    • Industries: They work in many industries such as Construction; Manufacturing; and Public Administration and Safety.
    • Earnings: Full-time workers on an adult wage earn around $1,190 per week (below the average of $1,460). Earnings tend to be lower when starting out and higher as experience grows.
    • Full-time: Many work full-time (66%, similar to the average of 66%).
    • Hours: Full-time workers spend around 41 hours per week at work (compared to the average of 44 hours).
    • Age: The average age is 44 years (compared to the average of 40 years).
    • Gender: 81% of workers are female (compared to the average of 48%).

    Employment Outlook

    Number of Workers

    Source: ABS Labour Force Survey, Department of Jobs and Small Business trend data to May 2018 and Department of Jobs and Small Business projections to 2023.
    YearNumber of Workers
    2008116900
    2009130200.0
    2010129600
    2011136500
    2012141100
    2013143500
    2014141700
    2015130400
    2016128800.0
    2017126900
    2018135900
    2023134300

    Weekly Earnings

    Weekly Earnings (Before Tax)

    Source: Based on ABS Survey of Employee Earnings and Hours (cat. no. 6306.0), May 2018, Customised Report. Median weekly total cash earnings for full-time non-managerial employees paid at the adult rate. Earnings are before tax and include amounts salary sacrificed. Earnings can vary greatly depending on the skills and experience of the worker and the demands of the role. These figures should be used as a guide only, not to determine a wage rate.
    EarningsAccounting ClerksAll Jobs Average
    Full-Time Earnings11901460

    Main Industries

    Main Employing Industries (% Share)

    Source: Based on ABS Census 2016, Customised Report. Industries are based on the Australian and New Zealand Standard Industrial Classification (ANZSIC 06).
    Main Employing IndustriesIndustry (% share)
    Construction11.9
    Manufacturing10.4
    Public Administration and Safety8.9
    Professional, Scientific and Technical Services8.5
    Other Industries60.3

    States and Territories

    • NSW

    • VIC

    • QLD

    • SA

    • TAS

    • NT

    • ACT

    Employment by State and Territory (% Share)

    Source: Based on Based on ABS Census 2016, Customised Report. Share of workers across Australian States and Territories, in this job compared to the all jobs average.
    StateAccounting ClerksAll Jobs Average
    NSW32.331.6
    VIC25.125.6
    QLD20.020.0
    SA6.77.0
    WA11.210.8
    TAS1.62.0
    NT0.91.0
    ACT2.11.9

    Age Profile

    Age Profile (% Share)

    Source: Based on Based on ABS Census 2016, Customised Report. Age profile of workers in this job compared to the all jobs average.
    Age BracketAccounting ClerksAll Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
    15-190.7-5.05.0
    20-245.1-9.39.3
    25-3421.9-22.922.9
    35-4425.0-22.022.0
    45-5425.9-21.621.6
    55-5910.2-9.09.0
    60-646.9-6.06.0
    65 and Over4.2-4.24.2

    Education Level

    Highest Level of Education (% Share)

    Source: ABS, ABS Census 2016, Customised Report. Highest qualification completed by workers in this job (in any field of study). Qualifications needed by new workers might be different from the qualifications of workers already in the job.
    Type of QualificationAccounting ClerksAll Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
    Post Graduate/Graduate Diploma or Graduate Certificate7.2-10.110.1
    Bachelor degree19.5-21.821.8
    Advanced Diploma/Diploma15.3-11.611.6
    Certificate III/IV16.2-21.121.1
    Year 1222.8-18.118.1
    Year 116.4-4.84.8
    Year 10 and below12.6-12.512.5

    You can work as an Accounting Clerk without formal qualifications, however, they may be useful. VET (Vocational Education and Training) and university are both common study pathways for Accounting Clerks.

    Thinking about study or training?

    Before starting a course, check it will provide you with the skills and qualifications you need.

    • Search and compare thousands of higher education courses, and their entry requirements from different institutions across Australia at Course Seeker website.
    • Compare undergraduate and postgraduate student experiences and outcomes on the QILT website.
    • Compare Vocational Education and Training (VET) courses, providers and student outcomes on the My Skills website.
    • You might be interested in Financial Services VET training pathways on the AAPathways website.

    Or check out related courses on Job Outlook.

    The course listings on this page are provided by Good Education Group.

    Employers look for Accounting Clerks who can work well with others, communicate as part of a team and have good computer literacy.

    Filter Skills & Knowledge

    Knowledge

    These are important topics, subjects or knowledge areas.

    1. Clerical

      70% Skill level

      Word processing, managing files and records, stenography and transcription, designing forms, and other office work.

    2. Economics and Accounting

      54% Skill level

      Economics and accounting, the financial markets, banking and checking and reporting of financial data.

    3. Mathematics

      54% Skill level

      Arithmetic, algebra, geometry, calculus, or statistics.

    4. English Language

      50% Skill level

      English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.

    5. Computers and Electronics

      47% Skill level

      Circuit boards, processors, chips, electronic equipment, and computer hardware and software, including applications and programming.

    Occupational Information Network
    O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.
    The skills and importance ratings on this page are derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2, 43-3031.00 - Bookkeeping, Accounting, and Auditing Clerks.

    Learn about the daily activities, and physical and social demands faced by workers. Explore the values and work styles that workers rate as most important.

    Filter Work Environment

    Demands

    The physical and social demands workers face most often are shown below.

    1. Telephone

      97% Important

      How often do you talk on the telephone?

    2. Repeating Same Tasks

      96% Important

      How important is it to repeat the same tasks or activities (e.g., key entry) over and over, without stopping?

    3. Being Exact or Accurate

      94% Important

      How important is being very exact or highly accurate?

    4. Electronic Mail

      92% Important

      How often do you use electronic mail?

    5. Indoors, Heat Controlled

      89% Important

      How often do you work indoors with access to heating or cooling?

    Occupational Information Network
    O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.
    The skills and importance ratings on this page are derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2, 43-3031.00 - Bookkeeping, Accounting, and Auditing Clerks.

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