Retail and Wool Buyers select and buy goods for resale in retail establishments, and value and buy wool sold by wool growers.

    Either extensive experience or a diploma in wool classing, retail merchandise management or another related field is needed to work as a Retail or Wool Buyer.

    Tasks

    • monitoring sales data and stock levels, and studying trade, manufacturers' and market information to keep informed of changing market conditions
    • negotiating purchase, promotion and supply arrangements with suppliers
    • designing and implementing pricing, marketing, promotional and display strategies
    • liaising with management on long-term planning and sales promotions
    • establishing working plans according to seasonal and budgetary requirements
    • anticipating consumer trends and determining quantity, style and quality of goods to be purchased
    • inspecting, comparing, selecting and valuing wool by determining colour, yield, micron and length
    • inspecting and buying wool at auction, in wool brokers' stores and in farm sheds
    • receiving samples from scoured wool exchanges
    • may visit freezing works to buy slipe wool

    More about Retail and Wool Buyers

    All Retail and Wool Buyers

    All Retail and Wool Buyers

    • $1,810 Weekly Pay
    • Strong Future Growth
    • Lower unemployment Unemployment
    • 6,400 workers Employment Size
    • Medium skill Skill level rating
    • 87% Full-Time Full-Time Share
    • 45 hours Average full-time
    • 37 years Average age
    • 55% female Gender Share

    The number of people working as Retail and Wool Buyers (in their main job) grew very strongly over the past 5 years and is expected to grow strongly over the next 5 years:
    from 6,400 in 2018 to 7,100 by 2023.
    Job openings can come from new jobs being created, but most come from turnover (workers leaving).
    There are likely to be around 4,000 job openings over 5 years (that's about 800 a year).

    • Size: This is a small occupation.
    • Unemployment: Unemployment was below average in 2018.
    • Location: Many Retail and Wool Buyers work in Victoria and New South Wales.
    • Industries: Most work in Retail Trade; Wholesale Trade; and Professional, Scientific and Technical Services.
    • Earnings: Full-time workers on an adult wage earn around $1,810 per week (very high compared to the average of $1,460). Earnings tend to be lower when starting out and higher as experience grows.
    • Full-time: Most work full-time (87%, much higher than the average of 66%).
    • Hours: Full-time workers spend around 45 hours per week at work (compared to the average of 44 hours).
    • Age: The average age is 37 years (compared to the average of 40 years).
    • Gender: 55% of workers are female (compared to the average of 48%).

    Employment Outlook

    Number of Workers

    Source: ABS Labour Force Survey, Department of Jobs and Small Business trend data to May 2018 and Department of Jobs and Small Business projections to 2023.
    YearNumber of Workers
    20084600
    20094400
    20106300
    20117100
    20124100
    20134700
    20144700
    20153400
    20166000
    20175100
    20186400
    20237100

    Weekly Earnings

    Weekly Earnings (Before Tax)

    Source: Based on ABS Survey of Employee Earnings and Hours (cat. no. 6306.0), May 2018, Customised Report. Median weekly total cash earnings for full-time non-managerial employees paid at the adult rate. Earnings are before tax and include amounts salary sacrificed. Earnings can vary greatly depending on the skills and experience of the worker and the demands of the role. These figures should be used as a guide only, not to determine a wage rate.
    EarningsRetail and Wool BuyersAll Jobs Average
    Full-Time Earnings18101460

    Main Industries

    Main Employing Industries (% Share)

    Source: Based on ABS Census 2016, Customised Report. Industries are based on the Australian and New Zealand Standard Industrial Classification (ANZSIC 06).
    Main Employing IndustriesIndustry (% share)
    Retail Trade76.5
    Wholesale Trade13.4
    Professional, Scientific and Technical Services1.8
    Manufacturing1.7
    Other Industries6.6

    States and Territories

    • NSW

    • VIC

    • QLD

    • SA

    • TAS

    • NT

    • ACT

    Employment by State and Territory (% Share)

    Source: Based on Based on ABS Census 2016, Customised Report. Share of workers across Australian States and Territories, in this job compared to the all jobs average.
    StateRetail and Wool BuyersAll Jobs Average
    NSW37.731.6
    VIC41.425.6
    QLD10.020.0
    SA4.47.0
    WA5.410.8
    TAS0.82.0
    NT0.11.0
    ACT0.21.9

    Age Profile

    Age Profile (% Share)

    Source: Based on Based on ABS Census 2016, Customised Report. Age profile of workers in this job compared to the all jobs average.
    Age BracketRetail and Wool BuyersAll Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
    15-190.3-5.05.0
    20-244.8-9.39.3
    25-3437.6-22.922.9
    35-4427.5-22.022.0
    45-5417.5-21.621.6
    55-595.5-9.09.0
    60-643.3-6.06.0
    65 and Over3.5-4.24.2

    Education Level

    Highest Level of Education (% Share)

    Source: ABS, ABS Census 2016, Customised Report. Highest qualification completed by workers in this job (in any field of study). Qualifications needed by new workers might be different from the qualifications of workers already in the job.
    Type of QualificationRetail and Wool BuyersAll Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
    Post Graduate/Graduate Diploma or Graduate Certificate6.7-10.110.1
    Bachelor degree33.8-21.821.8
    Advanced Diploma/Diploma16.0-11.611.6
    Certificate III/IV10.5-21.121.1
    Year 1221.7-18.118.1
    Year 114.0-4.84.8
    Year 10 and below7.3-12.512.5

    Either extensive experience or a diploma in wool classing, retail merchandise management or another related field is needed to work as a Retail or Wool Buyer.

    Membership with Australian Retailers Association/Australian Wool Exchange may be useful.

    Thinking about study or training?

    Before starting a course, check it will provide you with the skills and qualifications you need.

    • Compare Vocational Education and Training (VET) courses, providers and student outcomes on the My Skills website.
    • You might be interested in Agriculture, Horticulture and Conservation & Land Management VET training pathways on the AAPathways website.

    Or check out related courses on Job Outlook.

    Useful links and resources


    The course listings on this page are provided by Good Education Group.

    Employers look for Retail and Wool Buyers who interact well with others, provide good customer service and are reliable.

    Filter Skills & Knowledge

    Knowledge

    These are important topics, subjects or knowledge areas.

    1. Customer and Personal Service

      64% Skill level

      Understanding customer needs, providing good quality service, and measuring customer satisfaction.

    2. Sales and Marketing

      63% Skill level

      Showing, promoting, and selling including marketing strategy, product demonstration, sales techniques, and sales control systems.

    3. Computers and Electronics

      59% Skill level

      Circuit boards, processors, chips, electronic equipment, and computer hardware and software, including applications and programming.

    4. Mathematics

      59% Skill level

      Arithmetic, algebra, geometry, calculus, or statistics.

    5. English Language

      57% Skill level

      English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.

    Occupational Information Network
    O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.
    The skills and importance ratings on this page are derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2, 13-1022.00 - Wholesale and Retail Buyers, Except Farm Products.

    Learn about the daily activities, and physical and social demands faced by workers. Explore the values and work styles that workers rate as most important.

    Filter Work Environment

    Demands

    The physical and social demands workers face most often are shown below.

    1. Electronic Mail

      100% Important

      How often do you use electronic mail?

    2. Indoors, Heat Controlled

      100% Important

      How often do you work indoors with access to heating or cooling?

    3. Telephone

      100% Important

      How often do you talk on the telephone?

    4. Contact With Others

      97% Important

      How much do you have contact with people (face-to-face, by telephone, or any other way)?

    5. Face-to-Face Discussions

      95% Important

      How often do you talk with people face-to-face?

    Occupational Information Network
    O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.
    The skills and importance ratings on this page are derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2, 13-1022.00 - Wholesale and Retail Buyers, Except Farm Products.

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