Other Wood Processing Machine Operators operate machines that strip and prepare logs, remove bark, cut logs and timber, create wood chips, and cut, glue, press, trim, sand, splice, mould and repair wooden boards of various grades, forms and combinations.

Specialisations: Debarker Operator, Docking Saw Operator, Log Preparer, Plywood and Veneer Repairer, Sawmill Moulder Operator, Veneer Production Machine Operator.

You can work as an Other Wood Processing Machine Operator without formal qualifications. Some on the job training may be provided. Training is also available through VET (Vocational Education and Training).

Tasks

  • Adjusts and cleans machines and performs minor repairs.
  • Secures timber into place and sets saws to produce specified sizes of plank and board to be cut.
  • Starts machines and feeds stock onto cutting saws, and operates automatic feeding mechanisms.
  • Raises and lowers saws to trim boards and remove defects such as rot and splits.
  • Controls lathes and slicing machines to produce veneers, and laminates veneers using glue.
  • Verifies dimensions of cut stock and accuracy of cuts.
  • Checks saws and other machines for safety, sharpness and correct functioning.

More about Paper and Wood Processing Machine Operators

All Paper and Wood Processing Machine Operators

  • $1,312 Weekly Pay
  • Decline Future Growth
  • Higher Unemployment Unemployment

Other Wood Processing Machine Operators

  • 2,100 workers Employment Size
  • Lower skill Skill level rating
  • 90% Full-Time Full-Time Share
  • 44 hours Average full-time
  • 41 years Average age
  • 4% female Gender Share

The number of people working as Other Wood Processing Machine Operators (in their main job) fell over 5 years:
from 2,300 in 2011 to 2,100 in 2016.

  • Size: This is a very small occupation.
  • Location: Other Wood Processing Machine Operators work in many regions of Australia.
  • Industries: Most work in Manufacturing; Wholesale Trade; and Agriculture, Forestry and Fishing.
  • Full-time: Most work full-time (90%, much higher than the average of 66%).
  • Hours: Full-time workers spend around 44 hours per week at work (compared to the average of 44 hours).
  • Age: The average age is 41 years (compared to the average of 40 years).
  • Gender: 4% of workers are female (compared to the average of 48%).

Employment Outlook

Number of Workers

No data is available for the selected graph for this Occupation.

Weekly Earnings

Weekly Earnings (Before Tax)

No data is available for the selected graph for this Occupation.

Main Industries

Main Employing Industries (% Share)

Source: Based on ABS Census 2016, Customised Report. Industries are based on the Australian and New Zealand Standard Industrial Classification (ANZSIC 06).
Main Employing IndustriesIndustry (% share)
Manufacturing59.8
Wholesale Trade11.4
Agriculture, Forestry and Fishing9.5
Construction9.0
Other Industries10.3

States and Territories

  • NSW

  • VIC

  • QLD

  • SA

  • TAS

  • NT

  • ACT

Employment by State and Territory (% Share)

Source: Based on Based on ABS Census 2016, Customised Report. Share of workers across Australian States and Territories, in this job compared to the all jobs average.
StateOther Wood Processing Machine OperatorsAll Jobs Average
NSW26.431.6
VIC27.725.6
QLD21.320.0
SA9.57.0
WA8.010.8
TAS6.42.0
NT0.11.0
ACT0.51.9

Age Profile

Age Profile (% Share)

Source: Based on Based on ABS Census 2016, Customised Report. Age profile of workers in this job compared to the all jobs average.
Age BracketOther Wood Processing Machine OperatorsAll Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
15-192.3-5.05.0
20-2412.3-9.39.3
25-3421.3-22.922.9
35-4422.3-22.022.0
45-5422.6-21.621.6
55-599.7-9.09.0
60-646.5-6.06.0
65 and Over2.9-4.24.2

Education Level

Highest Level of Education (% Share)

Source: ABS, ABS Census 2016, Customised Report. Highest qualification completed by workers in this job (in any field of study). Qualifications needed by new workers might be different from the qualifications of workers already in the job.
Type of QualificationOther Wood Processing Machine OperatorsAll Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
Post Graduate/Graduate Diploma or Graduate Certificate0.0-10.110.1
Bachelor degree1.1-21.821.8
Advanced Diploma/Diploma3.1-11.611.6
Certificate III/IV26.5-21.121.1
Year 1219.9-18.118.1
Year 1110.4-4.84.8
Year 10 and below39.0-12.512.5

You can work as an Other Wood Processing Machine Operator without formal qualifications. Some on the job training may be provided. Training is also available through VET (Vocational Education and Training).

Checks, licences and tickets

You may need:

  • forklift licence

Thinking about study or training?

Before starting a course, check it will provide you with the skills and qualifications you need.

  • Compare Vocational Education and Training (VET) courses, providers and student outcomes on the My Skills website.
  • You might be interested in Pulp & Paper Manufacturing Industry and Forest and Wood Products Industry VET training pathways on the AAPathways website.

Or check out related courses on Job Outlook.

The course listings on this page are provided by Good Education Group.

Employers look for Paper and Wood Processing Machine Operators who are hardworking, have good people skills and are reliable.

Filter Skills & Knowledge

Knowledge

These are important topics, subjects or knowledge areas.

  1. Mechanical

    52% Skill level

    Machines and tools, including their designs, uses, repair, and maintenance.

  2. Production and Processing

    41% Skill level

    Raw materials, production processes, quality control, costs, and ways of making and distributing goods.

  3. Mathematics

    41% Skill level

    Arithmetic, algebra, geometry, calculus, or statistics.

  4. Education and Training

    38% Skill level

    Curriculum and training design, teaching and instruction for individuals and groups, and the measurement of training effects.

  5. Public Safety and Security

    31% Skill level

    Use of equipment, rules and ideas to protect people, data, property, and institutions.

Occupational Information Network
O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.
The skills and importance ratings on this page are derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2, 51-7042.00 - Woodworking Machine Setters, Operators, and Tenders, Except Sawing.

Learn about the daily activities, and physical and social demands faced by workers. Explore the values and work styles that workers rate as most important.

Filter Work Environment

Demands

The physical and social demands workers face most often are shown below.

  1. Exposed to Contaminants

    100% Important

    How often are you exposed to pollutants, gases, dust or odours?

  2. Face-to-Face Discussions

    97% Important

    How often do you talk with people face-to-face?

  3. Spend Time Using Your Hands to Handle, Control, or Feel

    96% Important

    How much time do you spend using your hands to handle, control, or feel objects, tools or controls?

  4. Sounds, Loud or Uncomfortable

    96% Important

    How often are you there sounds and noise levels that are distracting or uncomfortable?

  5. Spend Time Standing

    95% Important

    How much time do you spend standing?

Occupational Information Network
O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.
The skills and importance ratings on this page are derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2, 51-7042.00 - Woodworking Machine Setters, Operators, and Tenders, Except Sawing.

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