Photographic Developers and Printers edit and adjust digital images, develop photographic film, and print photographic images from digital media, negatives and positives using computer software, fully automatic equipment and by separate processes.

Specialisations: Copy Camera Operator, Dark Room Attendant, Digital Photographic Printer, Film Process Operator, Minilab Operator, Photographic Enlarger Operator, Silver Recovery Operator, Slide Developer.

You can work as a Photographic Developer and Printer without formal qualifications. Some on the job training may be provided. Training is also available through VET (Vocational Education and Training).

Tasks

  • cropping images and adjusting colour, brightness and contrast
  • preparing exposed film for different processing batches in dark rooms and dark chambers
  • adjusting settings and running automatic developing equipment
  • inspecting prints and adjusting settings on print-making equipment to produce required number, size and type of prints
  • scanning images onto electronic media
  • checking and replenishing chemicals and water supply for chemical and water baths required to produce negative and positive prints
  • monitoring and testing photographic processing and printing equipment, and maintaining operational standards
  • may prepare chemical solutions for different techniques and effects
  • may develop black and white images by separate processes and operate enlargers
  • may develop motion picture film

All Photographic Developers and Printers

  • Unavailable Weekly Pay
  • Decline Future Growth
  • Lower unemployment Unemployment
  • 910 workers Employment Size
  • Lower skill Skill level rating
  • 53% Full-Time Full-Time Share
  • 41 hours Average full-time
  • 37 years Average age
  • 61% female Gender Share

The number of people working as Photographic Developers and Printers (in their main job) fell over the past 5 years and is expected to fall over the next 5 years:
from 910 in 2018 to 800 by 2023.
Job openings can come from new jobs being created, but most come from turnover (workers leaving).
There are likely to be less than 1,000 job openings over 5 years.

  • Size: This is a very small occupation.
  • Unemployment: Unemployment was below average in 2018.
  • Location: Photographic Developers and Printers work in many regions of Australia.
  • Industries: Most work in Retail Trade; Health Care and Social Assistance; and Other Services.
  • Full-time: Around half work full-time (53%, less than the average of 66%), showing there are many opportunities to work part-time.
  • Hours: Full-time workers spend around 41 hours per week at work (compared to the average of 44 hours).
  • Age: The average age is 37 years (compared to the average of 40 years). Many workers are under 25 years of age (24%).
  • Gender: 61% of workers are female (compared to the average of 48%).

Employment Outlook

Number of Workers

Source: ABS Labour Force Survey, Department of Jobs and Small Business trend data to May 2018 and Department of Jobs and Small Business projections to 2023.
YearNumber of Workers
20083600
20093500
20101600
20112600
20121400
20131400
20141000
20151200
20161800
20171000
2018900
2023800

Weekly Earnings

Weekly Earnings (Before Tax)

No data is available for the selected graph for this Occupation.

Main Industries

Main Employing Industries (% Share)

Source: Based on ABS Census 2016, Customised Report. Industries are based on the Australian and New Zealand Standard Industrial Classification (ANZSIC 06).
Main Employing IndustriesIndustry (% share)
Retail Trade31.6
Health Care and Social Assistance18.4
Other Services17.6
Manufacturing9.5
Other Industries22.9

States and Territories

  • NSW

  • VIC

  • QLD

  • SA

  • TAS

  • NT

  • ACT

Employment by State and Territory (% Share)

Source: Based on ABS Census 2016, Customised Report. Share of workers across Australian States and Territories, in this job compared to the all jobs average.
StatePhotographic Developers and PrintersAll Jobs Average
NSW28.631.6
VIC23.125.6
QLD21.620.0
SA7.67.0
WA15.210.8
TAS1.92.0
NT0.01.0
ACT1.91.9

Age Profile

Age Profile (% Share)

Source: Based on ABS Census 2016, Customised Report. Age profile of workers in this job compared to the all jobs average.
Age BracketPhotographic Developers and PrintersAll Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
15-196.6-5.05.0
20-2417.2-9.39.3
25-3421.9-22.922.9
35-4418.8-22.022.0
45-5417.7-21.621.6
55-599.5-9.09.0
60-645.1-6.06.0
65 and Over3.3-4.24.2

Education Level

Highest Level of Education (% Share)

Source: ABS Census 2016, Customised Report. Highest qualification completed by workers in this job (in any field of study). Qualifications needed by new workers might be different from the qualifications of workers already in the job.
Type of QualificationPhotographic Developers and PrintersAll Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
Post Graduate/Graduate Diploma or Graduate Certificate4.2-10.110.1
Bachelor degree15.3-21.821.8
Advanced Diploma/Diploma13.0-11.611.6
Certificate III/IV16.3-21.121.1
Year 1229.3-18.118.1
Year 116.6-4.84.8
Year 10 and below15.2-12.512.5

You can work as a Photographic Developer and Printer without formal qualifications. Some on the job training may be provided. Training is also available through VET (Vocational Education and Training).

Thinking about study or training?

Before starting a course, check it will provide you with the skills and qualifications you need.

  • Compare Vocational Education and Training (VET) courses, providers and student outcomes on the My Skills website.

Or check out related courses on Job Outlook.

The course listings on this page are provided by Good Education Group.

Employers look for Photographic Developers and Printers who have good attention to detail, are reliable and hardworking.

Filter Skills & Knowledge

Knowledge

These are important topics, subjects or knowledge areas.

  1. Customer and Personal Service

    54% Skill level

    Understanding customer needs, providing good quality service, and measuring customer satisfaction.

  2. Production and Processing

    47% Skill level

    Raw materials, production processes, quality control, costs, and ways of making and distributing goods.

  3. Computers and Electronics

    46% Skill level

    Circuit boards, processors, chips, electronic equipment, and computer hardware and software, including applications and programming.

  4. Chemistry

    46% Skill level

    Chemical composition, structure, and properties. How chemicals are made, used, mixed, and can change.

  5. Education and Training

    44% Skill level

    Curriculum and training design, teaching and instruction for individuals and groups, and the measurement of training effects.

Occupational Information Network
O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.
The skills and importance ratings on this page are derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2, 51-9151.00 - Photographic Process Workers and Processing Machine Operators.

Learn about the daily activities, and physical and social demands faced by workers. Explore the values and work styles that workers rate as most important.

Filter Work Environment

Demands

The physical and social demands workers face most often are shown below.

  1. Indoors, Heat Controlled

    89% Important

    How often do you work indoors with access to heating or cooling?

  2. Spend Time Using Your Hands to Handle, Control, or Feel

    86% Important

    How much time do you spend using your hands to handle, control, or feel objects, tools or controls?

  3. Time Pressure

    85% Important

    How often does this job require the worker to meet strict deadlines?

  4. Face-to-Face Discussions

    84% Important

    How often do you talk with people face-to-face?

  5. Being Exact or Accurate

    81% Important

    How important is being very exact or highly accurate?

Occupational Information Network
O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.
The skills and importance ratings on this page are derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2, 51-9151.00 - Photographic Process Workers and Processing Machine Operators.

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