Machine Operators (not covered elsewhere) includes jobs like Amusement Ride Operator, Asbestos Remover, Brush Maker, Film Cutter, Pressurised Container Filler, Remotely Operated Vehicle (ROV) Pilot, and Venetian Blind Machine Operator.

    There are several occupations in this group, which may have varying study pathways.

    Tasks

    • Prepares machines for operation by selecting and installing attachments and components for specialised functions.
    • Sets and operates controls used to regulate processing operations.
    • Starts machines and monitors operation to detect faults and ensure effectiveness of operation.

    All Other Machine Operators

    • $1,387 Weekly Pay
    • Stable Future Growth
    • Higher Unemployment Unemployment

    Machine Operators (not covered elsewhere)

    • 4,200 workers Employment Size
    • Lower skill Skill level rating
    • 67% Full-Time Full-Time Share
    • 43 hours Average full-time
    • 36 years Average age
    • 15% female Gender Share

    The number of people working as Machine Operators (not covered elsewhere) (in their main job) grew very strongly over 5 years:
    from 2,700 in 2011 to 4,200 in 2016.

    • Size: This is a very small occupation.
    • Location: Machine Operators (not covered elsewhere) work in many regions of Australia.
    • Industries: Most work in Electricity, Gas, Water and Waste Services; Manufacturing; and Arts and Recreation Services.
    • Full-time: Many work full-time (67%, similar to the average of 66%).
    • Hours: Full-time workers spend around 43 hours per week at work (compared to the average of 44 hours).
    • Age: The average age is 36 years (compared to the average of 40 years). Many workers are under 25 years of age (24%).
    • Gender: 15% of workers are female (compared to the average of 48%).

    Employment Outlook

    Number of Workers

    No data is available for the selected graph for this Occupation.

    Weekly Earnings

    Weekly Earnings (Before Tax)

    No data is available for the selected graph for this Occupation.

    Main Industries

    Main Employing Industries (% Share)

    Source: Based on ABS Census 2016, Customised Report. Industries are based on the Australian and New Zealand Standard Industrial Classification (ANZSIC 06).
    Main Employing IndustriesIndustry (% share)
    Electricity, Gas, Water and Waste Services20.7
    Manufacturing20.1
    Arts and Recreation Services18.8
    Construction17.8
    Other Industries22.6

    States and Territories

    • NSW

    • VIC

    • QLD

    • SA

    • TAS

    • NT

    • ACT

    Employment by State and Territory (% Share)

    Source: Based on Based on ABS Census 2016, Customised Report. Share of workers across Australian States and Territories, in this job compared to the all jobs average.
    StateMachine Operators (not covered elsewhere)All Jobs Average
    NSW28.431.6
    VIC28.625.6
    QLD24.720.0
    SA7.07.0
    WA7.210.8
    TAS1.92.0
    NT0.61.0
    ACT1.51.9

    Age Profile

    Age Profile (% Share)

    Source: Based on Based on ABS Census 2016, Customised Report. Age profile of workers in this job compared to the all jobs average.
    Age BracketMachine Operators (not covered elsewhere)All Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
    15-198.4-5.05.0
    20-2415.1-9.39.3
    25-3424.2-22.922.9
    35-4419.3-22.022.0
    45-5418.9-21.621.6
    55-597.4-9.09.0
    60-644.6-6.06.0
    65 and Over2.3-4.24.2

    Education Level

    Highest Level of Education (% Share)

    Source: ABS, ABS Census 2016, Customised Report. Highest qualification completed by workers in this job (in any field of study). Qualifications needed by new workers might be different from the qualifications of workers already in the job.
    Type of QualificationMachine Operators (not covered elsewhere)All Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
    Post Graduate/Graduate Diploma or Graduate Certificate1.8-10.110.1
    Bachelor degree6.9-21.821.8
    Advanced Diploma/Diploma6.4-11.611.6
    Certificate III/IV24.6-21.121.1
    Year 1226.5-18.118.1
    Year 118.1-4.84.8
    Year 10 and below25.7-12.512.5

    There are several occupations in this group, which may have varying study pathways.

    Thinking about study or training?

    Before starting a course, check it will provide you with the skills and qualifications you need.

    • Compare Vocational Education and Training (VET) courses, providers and student outcomes on the My Skills website.
    • You might be interested in Chemical, Hydrocarbons & Refining VET training pathways on the AAPathways website.

    Or check out related courses on Job Outlook.

    The course listings on this page are provided by Good Education Group.

    Employers look for Other Machine Operators who are hardworking, can work well with others and are reliable.

    Filter Skills & Knowledge

    Knowledge

    These are important topics, subjects or knowledge areas.

    1. Production and Processing

      72% Skill level

      Raw materials, production processes, quality control, costs, and ways of making and distributing goods.

    2. Chemistry

      68% Skill level

      Chemical composition, structure, and properties. How chemicals are made, used, mixed, and can change.

    3. Mechanical

      64% Skill level

      Machines and tools, including their designs, uses, repair, and maintenance.

    4. Computers and Electronics

      63% Skill level

      Circuit boards, processors, chips, electronic equipment, and computer hardware and software, including applications and programming.

    5. Engineering and Technology

      58% Skill level

      The use engineering science and technology to design and produce goods and services.

    Occupational Information Network
    O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.
    The skills and importance ratings on this page are derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2, 51-9011.00 - Chemical Equipment Operators and Tenders.

    Learn about the daily activities, and physical and social demands faced by workers. Explore the values and work styles that workers rate as most important.

    Filter Work Environment

    Demands

    The physical and social demands workers face most often are shown below.

    1. Wear Common Protective or Safety Equipment

      100% Important

      How often do you wear equipment like safety shoes, glasses, gloves, hard hats or life jackets?

    2. Face-to-Face Discussions

      94% Important

      How often do you talk with people face-to-face?

    3. Exposed to Contaminants

      94% Important

      How often are you exposed to pollutants, gases, dust or odours?

    4. Exposed to Hazardous Conditions

      91% Important

      How often do you work near dangers like high voltage electricity, flammable material, explosives or chemicals?

    5. Responsible for Others' Health and Safety

      89% Important

      How responsible are you for the health and safety of others?

    Occupational Information Network
    O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.
    The skills and importance ratings on this page are derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2, 51-9011.00 - Chemical Equipment Operators and Tenders.

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