Tow Truck Drivers drive tow trucks requiring a specially endorsed class of licence, to transport broken-down motor vehicles.

Specialisations: Mechanic Recovery (Army).

You can work as a Tow Truck Driver without formal qualifications. Some on the job training may be provided. A course in driving operations might be helpful.

Tasks

  • Travels to scene of accident, illegal parking or other situation requiring towing.
  • Attaches towing equipment to vehicle or winches vehicle onto tilt-deck winch- truck.
  • Tows vehicle to depot or other location.
  • Carries out winching and heavy salvage.
  • Maintains and repairs equipment.
  • Keeps records.

All Truck Drivers

  • $1,509 Weekly Pay
  • Moderate Future Growth
  • Lower unemployment Unemployment

Tow Truck Drivers

  • 2,300 workers Employment Size
  • Lower skill Skill level rating
  • 81% Full-Time Full-Time Share
  • 50 hours Average full-time
  • 44 years Average age
  • 1% female Gender Share

The number of people working as Tow Truck Drivers (in their main job) grew very strongly over 5 years:
from 1,800 in 2011 to 2,300 in 2016.

  • Size: This is a very small occupation.
  • Location: Tow Truck Drivers work in many regions of Australia.
  • Industries: Most work in Transport, Postal and Warehousing; Other Services; and Public Administration and Safety.
  • Full-time: Most work full-time (81%, much higher than the average of 66%).
  • Hours: Full-time workers spend around 50 hours per week at work (compared to the average of 44 hours).
  • Age: The average age is 44 years (compared to the average of 40 years).
  • Gender: 1% of workers are female (compared to the average of 48%).

Employment Outlook

Number of Workers

No data is available for the selected graph for this Occupation.

Weekly Earnings

Weekly Earnings (Before Tax)

No data is available for the selected graph for this Occupation.

Main Industries

Main Employing Industries (% Share)

Source: Based on ABS Census 2016, Customised Report. Industries are based on the Australian and New Zealand Standard Industrial Classification (ANZSIC 06).
Main Employing IndustriesIndustry (% share)
Transport, Postal and Warehousing73.8
Other Services8.8
Public Administration and Safety7.0
Electricity, Gas, Water and Waste Services5.8
Other Industries4.6

States and Territories

  • NSW

  • VIC

  • QLD

  • SA

  • TAS

  • NT

  • ACT

Employment by State and Territory (% Share)

Source: Based on Based on ABS Census 2016, Customised Report. Share of workers across Australian States and Territories, in this job compared to the all jobs average.
StateTow Truck DriversAll Jobs Average
NSW30.731.6
VIC23.325.6
QLD24.920.0
SA7.57.0
WA9.510.8
TAS1.02.0
NT1.41.0
ACT1.71.9

Age Profile

Age Profile (% Share)

Source: Based on Based on ABS Census 2016, Customised Report. Age profile of workers in this job compared to the all jobs average.
Age BracketTow Truck DriversAll Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
15-190.4-5.05.0
20-245.2-9.39.3
25-3422.0-22.922.9
35-4424.3-22.022.0
45-5426.6-21.621.6
55-5910.7-9.09.0
60-647.5-6.06.0
65 and Over3.4-4.24.2

Education Level

Highest Level of Education (% Share)

Source: ABS, ABS Census 2016, Customised Report. Highest qualification completed by workers in this job (in any field of study). Qualifications needed by new workers might be different from the qualifications of workers already in the job.
Type of QualificationTow Truck DriversAll Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
Post Graduate/Graduate Diploma or Graduate Certificate0.1-10.110.1
Bachelor degree1.4-21.821.8
Advanced Diploma/Diploma4.0-11.611.6
Certificate III/IV34.3-21.121.1
Year 1215.0-18.118.1
Year 117.5-4.84.8
Year 10 and below37.7-12.512.5

You can work as a Tow Truck Driver without formal qualifications. Some on the job training may be provided. A course in driving operations might be helpful.

Checks, licences and tickets

You may need:

  • forklift licence
  • medium rigid (MR) driver's licence
  • heavy ridged (HR) driver's licence
  • national police check
  • Psychometric or aptitude tests

Thinking about study or training?

Before starting a course, check it will provide you with the skills and qualifications you need.

  • Compare Vocational Education and Training (VET) courses, providers and student outcomes on the My Skills website.
  • You might be interested in Transport and Logistics Training Package VET training pathways on the AAPathways website.

Or check out related courses on Job Outlook.

Useful links and resources


The course listings on this page are provided by Good Education Group.

Employers look for Truck Drivers who are reliable, provide good customer service and are well presented.

Filter Skills & Knowledge

Knowledge

These are important topics, subjects or knowledge areas.

  1. Transportation

    60% Skill level

    Moving people or goods by air, rail, sea, or road.

  2. Customer and Personal Service

    59% Skill level

    Understanding customer needs, providing good quality service, and measuring customer satisfaction.

  3. Public Safety and Security

    50% Skill level

    Use of equipment, rules and ideas to protect people, data, property, and institutions.

  4. Mechanical

    49% Skill level

    Machines and tools, including their designs, uses, repair, and maintenance.

  5. English Language

    47% Skill level

    English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.

Occupational Information Network
O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.
The skills and importance ratings on this page are derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2, 53-3032.00 - Heavy and Tractor-Trailer Truck Drivers.

Learn about the daily activities, and physical and social demands faced by workers. Explore the values and work styles that workers rate as most important.

Filter Work Environment

Demands

The physical and social demands workers face most often are shown below.

  1. In an Enclosed Vehicle or Equipment

    94% Important

    How often do you work in a closed vehicle (e.g., car)?

  2. Outdoors, Exposed to Weather

    88% Important

    How often do you work outdoors, exposed to the weather?

  3. Time Pressure

    87% Important

    How often does this job require the worker to meet strict deadlines?

  4. Very Hot or Cold Temperatures

    86% Important

    How often do you work in very hot or very cold temperatures (above 32 or below 0 degrees Celsius)?

  5. Telephone

    83% Important

    How often do you talk on the telephone?

Occupational Information Network
O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.
The skills and importance ratings on this page are derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2, 53-3032.00 - Heavy and Tractor-Trailer Truck Drivers.

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