Commercial Cleaners clean offices, residential complexes, hospitals, schools, industrial work areas, industrial machines, construction sites and other commercial premises using heavy duty cleaning equipment.

Specialisations: Aircraft Cabin Cleaner, School Cleaner.

You can work as a Commercial Cleaner without formal qualifications. Some on the job training may be provided. Traineeships may be available.

Tasks

  • vacuuming carpets, curtains and upholstered furniture
  • cleaning, dusting and polishing furniture, fixtures and fittings
  • removing rubbish and recyclable material, and emptying containers, bins and trays
  • stripping wax from floors, re-waxing and polishing floors
  • cleaning and disinfecting laundry and bathroom fixtures, replenishing supplies and reporting defective plumbing fixtures
  • operating industrial vacuum cleaners to clean floors, work areas and machines
  • removing dust and dirt from ceilings, walls, overhead pipes and fixtures
  • applying acids and solvents to surfaces to remove stains and dirt
  • removing lint, dust, soot, oil, grease, sludge and other residues from machines, hulls and holds of ships, and interiors and exteriors of furnaces, boilers and tanks
  • may clean exteriors of buildings by sand-blasting and applying solvents

All Commercial Cleaners

  • $904 Weekly Pay
  • Moderate Future Growth
  • Average unemployment Unemployment
  • 164,500 workers Employment Size
  • Entry level Skill level rating
  • 33% Full-Time Full-Time Share
  • 42 hours Average full-time
  • 47 years Average age
  • 57% female Gender Share

The number of people working as Commercial Cleaners (in their main job) grew moderately the past 5 years and is expected to grow over the next 5 years:
from 164,500 in 2018 to 170,600 by 2023.
Job openings can come from new jobs being created, but most come from turnover (workers leaving).
There are likely to be around 136,000 job openings over 5 years (that's about 27,200 a year).

  • Size: This is a very large occupation.
  • Unemployment: Unemployment was average in 2018.
  • Location: Commercial Cleaners work in many regions of Australia.
  • Industries: Most work in Administrative and Support Services; Health Care and Social Assistance; and Education and Training.
  • Earnings: Full-time workers on an adult wage earn around $904 per week (lower than the average of $1,460). Earnings tend to be lower when starting out and higher as experience grows.
  • Full-time: Less than half work full-time (33%, less than the average of 66%), showing there are many opportunities to work part-time.
  • Hours: Full-time workers spend around 42 hours per week at work (compared to the average of 44 hours).
  • Age: The average age is 47 years (compared to the average of 40 years). Many workers are 45 years or older (55%).
  • Gender: 57% of workers are female (compared to the average of 48%).

Employment Outlook

Number of Workers

Source: ABS Labour Force Survey, Department of Jobs and Small Business trend data to May 2018 and Department of Jobs and Small Business projections to 2023.
YearNumber of Workers
2008142600
2009142700
2010159900
2011155300
2012161100
2013157800
2014149300
2015139600
2016149300
2017143500
2018164500
2023170600

Weekly Earnings

Weekly Earnings (Before Tax)

Source: Based on ABS Survey of Employee Earnings and Hours (cat. no. 6306.0), May 2018, Customised Report. Median weekly total cash earnings for full-time non-managerial employees paid at the adult rate. Earnings are before tax and include amounts salary sacrificed. Earnings can vary greatly depending on the skills and experience of the worker and the demands of the role. These figures should be used as a guide only, not to determine a wage rate.
EarningsCommercial CleanersAll Jobs Average
Full-Time Earnings9041460

Main Industries

Main Employing Industries (% Share)

Source: Based on ABS Census 2016, Customised Report. Industries are based on the Australian and New Zealand Standard Industrial Classification (ANZSIC 06).
Main Employing IndustriesIndustry (% share)
Administrative and Support Services44.6
Health Care and Social Assistance13.4
Education and Training11.2
Accommodation and Food Services9.0
Other Industries21.8

States and Territories

  • NSW

  • VIC

  • QLD

  • SA

  • TAS

  • NT

  • ACT

Employment by State and Territory (% Share)

Source: Based on ABS Census 2016, Customised Report. Share of workers across Australian States and Territories, in this job compared to the all jobs average.
StateCommercial CleanersAll Jobs Average
NSW29.931.6
VIC21.925.6
QLD23.120.0
SA7.77.0
WA12.210.8
TAS2.82.0
NT0.91.0
ACT1.41.9

Age Profile

Age Profile (% Share)

Source: Based on ABS Census 2016, Customised Report. Age profile of workers in this job compared to the all jobs average.
Age BracketCommercial CleanersAll Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
15-193.9-5.05.0
20-247.4-9.39.3
25-3417.1-22.922.9
35-4416.6-22.022.0
45-5423.8-21.621.6
55-5913.5-9.09.0
60-6410.7-6.06.0
65 and Over7.1-4.24.2

Education Level

Highest Level of Education (% Share)

Source: ABS Census 2016, Customised Report. Highest qualification completed by workers in this job (in any field of study). Qualifications needed by new workers might be different from the qualifications of workers already in the job.
Type of QualificationCommercial CleanersAll Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
Post Graduate/Graduate Diploma or Graduate Certificate2.7-10.110.1
Bachelor degree9.2-21.821.8
Advanced Diploma/Diploma7.0-11.611.6
Certificate III/IV14.4-21.121.1
Year 1222.9-18.118.1
Year 117.7-4.84.8
Year 10 and below36.2-12.512.5

You can work as a Commercial Cleaner without formal qualifications. Some on the job training may be provided. Traineeships may be available.

Checks, licences and tickets

You may need:

  • national police check

Thinking about study or training?

Before starting a course, check it will provide you with the skills and qualifications you need.

  • Compare Vocational Education and Training (VET) courses, providers and student outcomes on the My Skills website.
  • You might be interested in Property Services VET training pathways on the AAPathways website.

Or check out related courses on Job Outlook.

Useful links and resources


The course listings on this page are provided by Good Education Group.

Employers look for Commercial Cleaners who are reliable, trustworthy and have a good work ethic.

Filter Skills & Knowledge

Knowledge

These are important topics, subjects or knowledge areas.

  1. Public safety and security

    39% Skill level

    Use of equipment, rules and ideas to protect people, data, property, and institutions.

  2. Customer and personal service

    38% Skill level

    Understanding customer needs, providing good quality service, and measuring customer satisfaction.

  3. English language

    37% Skill level

    English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.

  4. Administration and management

    34% Skill level

    Business principles involved in strategic planning, leadership, and coordinating people and resources.

  5. Chemistry

    31% Skill level

    Chemical composition, structure, and properties. How chemicals are made, used, mixed, and can change.

Occupational Information Network
O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.
The skills and importance ratings on this page are derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2, 37-2011.00 - Janitors and Cleaners, Except Maids and Housekeeping Cleaners.

Learn about the daily activities, and physical and social demands faced by workers. Explore the values and work styles that workers rate as most important.

Filter Work Environment

Demands

The physical and social demands workers face most often are shown below.

  1. Spend time standing

    96% Important

    Spend time standing at work.

  2. Face-to-face discussions

    85% Important

    Talk with people face-to-face.

  3. Indoors, heat controlled

    84% Important

    Work indoors with access to heating or cooling.

  4. Freedom to make decisions

    83% Important

    Have freedom to make decision on your own.

  5. Unstructured work

    82% Important

    Have freedom to decide on tasks, priorities, and goals.

Occupational Information Network
O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.
The skills and importance ratings on this page are derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2, 37-2011.00 - Janitors and Cleaners, Except Maids and Housekeeping Cleaners.

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