Rubber Factory Workers perform routine tasks in manufacturing tyres and other rubber products.

Also known as: Rubber Process Hand.

Specialisations: Latex Foam Worker.

You can work as a Rubber Factory Worker without formal qualifications, however, they may be useful. A course in polymer processing might be helpful.

Tasks

  • Adjusts steam and water valves to regulate heat of machine, depending on process to be carried out.
  • Inserts die or mould to machine or press where required.
  • Loads or feeds raw rubber or rubber compounds to machine, before or after starting machine.
  • Adjusts machine controls or processes where necessary to ensure correct thickness of product or speed of extrusion.
  • Removes finished product from machine by hand or with hand tools.
  • Washes crude rubber, applies chemicals where required and operates special types of machines or presses.

More about Plastics and Rubber Factory Workers

All Plastics and Rubber Factory Workers

  • $1,027 Weekly Pay
  • Decline Future Growth
  • Higher Unemployment Unemployment

Rubber Factory Workers

  • 300 workers Employment Size
  • Entry level Skill level rating
  • 81% Full-Time Full-Time Share
  • 41 hours Average full-time
  • 42 years Average age
  • 8% female Gender Share

The number of people working as Rubber Factory Workers (in their main job) fell over 5 years:
from 430 in 2011 to 300 in 2016.

  • Size: This is a very small occupation.
  • Location: Rubber Factory Workers work in many regions of Australia.
  • Industries: Most work in Manufacturing; Wholesale Trade; and Other Services.
  • Full-time: Most work full-time (81%, much higher than the average of 66%).
  • Hours: Full-time workers spend around 41 hours per week at work (compared to the average of 44 hours).
  • Age: The average age is 42 years (compared to the average of 40 years).
  • Gender: 8% of workers are female (compared to the average of 48%).

Employment Outlook

Number of Workers

No data is available for the selected graph for this Occupation.

Weekly Earnings

Weekly Earnings (Before Tax)

No data is available for the selected graph for this Occupation.

Main Industries

Main Employing Industries (% Share)

Source: Based on ABS Census 2016, Customised Report. Industries are based on the Australian and New Zealand Standard Industrial Classification (ANZSIC 06).
Main Employing IndustriesIndustry (% share)
Manufacturing58.8
Wholesale Trade7.3
Other Services6.1
Transport, Postal and Warehousing5.7
Other Industries22.1

States and Territories

  • NSW

  • VIC

  • QLD

  • SA

  • TAS

  • NT

  • ACT

Employment by State and Territory (% Share)

Source: Based on Based on ABS Census 2016, Customised Report. Share of workers across Australian States and Territories, in this job compared to the all jobs average.
StateRubber Factory WorkersAll Jobs Average
NSW32.431.6
VIC29.325.6
QLD20.620.0
SA10.17.0
WA6.610.8
TAS0.02.0
NT0.01.0
ACT1.01.9

Age Profile

Age Profile (% Share)

Source: Based on Based on ABS Census 2016, Customised Report. Age profile of workers in this job compared to the all jobs average.
Age BracketRubber Factory WorkersAll Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
15-194.2-5.05.0
20-248.4-9.39.3
25-3417.9-22.922.9
35-4419.6-22.022.0
45-5422.8-21.621.6
55-5917.9-9.09.0
60-646.0-6.06.0
65 and Over3.2-4.24.2

Education Level

Highest Level of Education (% Share)

Source: ABS, ABS Census 2016, Customised Report. Highest qualification completed by workers in this job (in any field of study). Qualifications needed by new workers might be different from the qualifications of workers already in the job.
Type of QualificationRubber Factory WorkersAll Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
Post Graduate/Graduate Diploma or Graduate Certificate0.0-10.110.1
Bachelor degree0.0-21.821.8
Advanced Diploma/Diploma3.4-11.611.6
Certificate III/IV16.0-21.121.1
Year 1223.9-18.118.1
Year 118.6-4.84.8
Year 10 and below48.1-12.512.5

You can work as a Rubber Factory Worker without formal qualifications, however, they may be useful. A course in polymer processing might be helpful.

Thinking about study or training?

Before starting a course, check it will provide you with the skills and qualifications you need.

  • Compare Vocational Education and Training (VET) courses, providers and student outcomes on the My Skills website.
  • You might be interested in Plastics, Rubber & Cablemaking VET training pathways on the AAPathways website.

Or check out related courses on Job Outlook.

The course listings on this page are provided by Good Education Group.

Employers look for Plastics and Rubber Factory Workers who work well in a team, can communicate clearly and are reliable.

Filter Skills & Knowledge

Knowledge

These are important topics, subjects or knowledge areas.

  1. Production and Processing

    61% Skill level

    Raw materials, production processes, quality control, costs, and ways of making and distributing goods.

  2. Public Safety and Security

    51% Skill level

    Use of equipment, rules and ideas to protect people, data, property, and institutions.

  3. Administration and Management

    47% Skill level

    Business principles involved in strategic planning, leadership, and coordinating people and resources.

  4. Education and Training

    44% Skill level

    Curriculum and training design, teaching and instruction for individuals and groups, and the measurement of training effects.

  5. Mathematics

    39% Skill level

    Arithmetic, algebra, geometry, calculus, or statistics.

Occupational Information Network
O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.
The skills and importance ratings on this page are derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2, 51-9197.00 - Tire Builders.

Learn about the daily activities, and physical and social demands faced by workers. Explore the values and work styles that workers rate as most important.

Filter Work Environment

Demands

The physical and social demands workers face most often are shown below.

  1. Sounds, Loud or Uncomfortable

    99% Important

    How often are you there sounds and noise levels that are distracting or uncomfortable?

  2. Spend Time Standing

    99% Important

    How much time do you spend standing?

  3. Spend Time Using Your Hands to Handle, Control, or Feel

    98% Important

    How much time do you spend using your hands to handle, control, or feel objects, tools or controls?

  4. Spend Time Making Repetitive Motions

    97% Important

    How much time do you spend making repetitive motions?

  5. Wear Common Protective or Safety Equipment

    97% Important

    How often do you wear equipment like safety shoes, glasses, gloves, hard hats or life jackets?

Occupational Information Network
O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.
The skills and importance ratings on this page are derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2, 51-9197.00 - Tire Builders.

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