Intelligence and Policy Analysts collect and analyse information and data to produce intelligence and to develop and analyse policies guiding the design, implementation and modification of government and commercial operations and programs.

    You usually need a bachelor degree in law, political science, policy studies or another related field to work as an Intelligence or Policy Analyst. Many Intelligence and Policy Analysts complete postgraduate studies.

    Tasks

    • determining organisational and client intelligence requirements
    • organising, collecting, collating and analysing data, and developing intelligence information such as electronic surveillance
    • compiling and disseminating intelligence information using briefings, maps, charts, reports and other methods
    • ascertaining the accuracy of data collected and reliability of sources
    • conducting threat and risk assessments and developing responses
    • liaising and consulting with program administrators and other interested parties to identify policy needs
    • reviewing existing policies and legislation to identify anomalies and out-of-date provisions
    • researching social, economic and industrial trends, and client expectations of programs and services provided
    • formulating and analysing policy options, preparing briefing papers and recommendations for policy changes, and advising on preferred options
    • assessing impacts, financial implications, interactions with other programs and political and administrative feasibility of policies

    More about Intelligence and Policy Analysts

    All Intelligence and Policy Analysts

    All Intelligence and Policy Analysts

    • $1,821 Weekly Pay
    • Very strong Future Growth
    • Lower unemployment Unemployment
    • 29,500 workers Employment Size
    • Very high skill Skill level rating
    • 80% Full-Time Full-Time Share
    • 41 hours Average full-time
    • 38 years Average age
    • 62% female Gender Share

    The number of people working as Intelligence and Policy Analysts (in their main job) grew very strongly over the past 5 years and is expected to grow very strongly over the next 5 years:
    from 29,500 in 2018 to 40,200 by 2023.
    Job openings can come from new jobs being created, but most come from turnover (workers leaving).
    There are likely to be around 38,000 job openings over 5 years (that's about 7,600 a year).

    • Size: This is a large occupation.
    • Unemployment: Unemployment was below average in 2018.
    • Location: Intelligence and Policy Analysts work in many parts of Australia. The Australian Capital Territory has a large share of workers.
    • Industries: Most work in Public Administration and Safety; Professional, Scientific and Technical Services; and Education and Training.
    • Earnings: Full-time workers on an adult wage earn around $1,821 per week (very high compared to the average of $1,460). Earnings tend to be lower when starting out and higher as experience grows.
    • Full-time: Many work full-time (80%, higher than the average of 66%).
    • Hours: Full-time workers spend around 41 hours per week at work (compared to the average of 44 hours).
    • Age: The average age is 38 years (compared to the average of 40 years).
    • Gender: 62% of workers are female (compared to the average of 48%).

    Employment Outlook

    Number of Workers

    Source: ABS Labour Force Survey, Department of Jobs and Small Business trend data to May 2018 and Department of Jobs and Small Business projections to 2023.
    YearNumber of Workers
    200813600
    200914000
    201021300
    201120400
    201224100
    201322500
    201418400
    201521600
    201622100
    201725300
    201829500
    202340200

    Weekly Earnings

    Weekly Earnings (Before Tax)

    Source: Based on ABS Survey of Employee Earnings and Hours (cat. no. 6306.0), May 2018, Customised Report. Median weekly total cash earnings for full-time non-managerial employees paid at the adult rate. Earnings are before tax and include amounts salary sacrificed. Earnings can vary greatly depending on the skills and experience of the worker and the demands of the role. These figures should be used as a guide only, not to determine a wage rate.
    EarningsIntelligence and Policy AnalystsAll Jobs Average
    Full-Time Earnings18211460

    Main Industries

    Main Employing Industries (% Share)

    Source: Based on ABS Census 2016, Customised Report. Industries are based on the Australian and New Zealand Standard Industrial Classification (ANZSIC 06).
    Main Employing IndustriesIndustry (% share)
    Public Administration and Safety78.9
    Professional, Scientific and Technical Services4.3
    Education and Training4.1
    Health Care and Social Assistance3.4
    Other Industries9.3

    States and Territories

    • NSW

    • VIC

    • QLD

    • SA

    • TAS

    • NT

    • ACT

    Employment by State and Territory (% Share)

    Source: Based on ABS Census 2016, Customised Report. Share of workers across Australian States and Territories, in this job compared to the all jobs average.
    StateIntelligence and Policy AnalystsAll Jobs Average
    NSW20.531.6
    VIC18.625.6
    QLD13.520.0
    SA5.57.0
    WA7.410.8
    TAS2.02.0
    NT1.51.0
    ACT31.11.9

    Age Profile

    Age Profile (% Share)

    Source: Based on ABS Census 2016, Customised Report. Age profile of workers in this job compared to the all jobs average.
    Age BracketIntelligence and Policy AnalystsAll Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
    15-190.1-5.05.0
    20-243.8-9.39.3
    25-3434.3-22.922.9
    35-4429.0-22.022.0
    45-5420.1-21.621.6
    55-597.2-9.09.0
    60-643.7-6.06.0
    65 and Over1.9-4.24.2

    Education Level

    Highest Level of Education (% Share)

    Source: ABS Census 2016, Customised Report. Highest qualification completed by workers in this job (in any field of study). Qualifications needed by new workers might be different from the qualifications of workers already in the job.
    Type of QualificationIntelligence and Policy AnalystsAll Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
    Post Graduate/Graduate Diploma or Graduate Certificate39.0-10.110.1
    Bachelor degree43.1-21.821.8
    Advanced Diploma/Diploma6.4-11.611.6
    Certificate III/IV3.8-21.121.1
    Year 126.3-18.118.1
    Year 110.6-4.84.8
    Year 10 and below0.8-12.512.5

    You usually need a bachelor degree in law, political science, policy studies or another related field to work as an Intelligence or Policy Analyst. Many Intelligence and Policy Analysts complete postgraduate studies.

    Checks, licences and tickets

    You may need:

    • driver's licence
    • Psychometric or aptitude tests
    • security clearance

    Thinking about study or training?

    Before starting a course, check it will provide you with the skills and qualifications you need.

    • Search and compare thousands of higher education courses, and their entry requirements from different institutions across Australia at Course Seeker website.
    • Compare undergraduate and postgraduate student experiences and outcomes on the QILT website.

    Or check out related courses on Job Outlook.

    The course listings on this page are provided by Good Education Group.

    Employers look for Intelligence and Policy Analysts who have strong attention to detail, can communicate clearly with a wide variety of people and can work well in a team.

    Filter Skills & Knowledge

    Knowledge

    These are important topics, subjects or knowledge areas.

    1. English language

      86% Skill level

      English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.

    2. Law and government

      82% Skill level

      How our laws and courts work. Government rules and regulations, and the political system.

    3. Education and training

      73% Skill level

      Curriculum and training design, teaching and instruction for individuals and groups, and the measurement of training effects.

    4. Sociology and anthropology

      70% Skill level

      Group behaviour and dynamics, societal trends and influences, human migrations, ethnicity, cultures and their history and origins.

    5. Philosophy and theology

      68% Skill level

      Philosophical systems and religions, including their basic principles, values, ethics, ways of thinking, customs, practices, and impact on society.

    Occupational Information Network
    O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.
    The skills and importance ratings on this page are derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2, 19-3094.00 - Political Scientists.

    Learn about the daily activities, and physical and social demands faced by workers. Explore the values and work styles that workers rate as most important.

    Filter Work Environment

    Demands

    The physical and social demands workers face most often are shown below.

    1. Electronic mail

      97% Important

      Use electronic mail.

    2. Freedom to make decisions

      97% Important

      Have freedom to make decision on your own.

    3. Unstructured work

      93% Important

      Have freedom to decide on tasks, priorities, and goals.

    4. Face-to-face discussions

      89% Important

      Talk with people face-to-face.

    5. Telephone

      89% Important

      Talk on the telephone.

    Occupational Information Network
    O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.
    The skills and importance ratings on this page are derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2, 19-3094.00 - Political Scientists.

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