Livestock Farmers plan, organise, control, coordinate and perform farming operations to breed and raise livestock.

At least 5 years of relevant experience is usually needed to work in this job (that's a skill level equal to a Bachelor Degree or higher).

Tasks

  • breeding and raising livestock for the production of honey, meat, milk, skins, eggs and wool
  • monitoring and maintaining the health and condition of livestock
  • providing pastures and fodder to maintain appropriate nutritional levels
  • moving livestock to optimise feeding opportunities
  • organising and conducting farming operations such as catching, drenching and milking livestock, sterilising machines, and collecting, grading and packaging produce
  • directing and overseeing general farming activities such as maintaining pens, sheds and cages, fertilising, controlling pests and weeds, and growing fodder
  • maintaining fences, equipment and water supply systems
  • organising the sale, purchase and transportation of livestock and produce
  • maintaining and evaluating records of farming activities, monitoring market activity and planning production accordingly
  • managing business capital including budgeting, taxation, debt and loan management
  • may select, train and supervise staff and contractors

Job Titles

  • Apiarist or Beekeeper
  • Beef Cattle Farmer, or Grazier
  • Dairy Cattle Farmer
  • Deer Farmer
  • Goat Farmer
  • Horse Breeder, or Horse Stud Manager
  • Mixed Livestock Farmer
  • Pig Farmer
  • Poultry Farmer
  • Sheep Farmer
  • Other Livestock Farmers
  • Apiarist or Beekeeper

    Plans, organises, controls, coordinates and operates apiaries to produce honey, queen bee pollen, beeswax and royal jelly, breed queen bees and pollinate crops.

  • Beef Cattle Farmer, or Grazier

    Breeds and raises beef cattle for meat and breeding stock.

    Specialisations: Stud Beef Cattle Farmer

  • Dairy Cattle Farmer

    Breeds and raises dairy cattle for milk, meat and breeding stock.

    Specialisations: Share Dairy Farmer, Stud Dairy Cattle Farmer

  • Deer Farmer

    Breeds and raises deer for meat, velvet, hides and breeding stock.

  • Goat Farmer

    Breeds and raises goats for fibre, milk, meat and breeding stock.

  • Horse Breeder, or Horse Stud Manager

    Breeds and raises horses for competition, dressage, eventing, showjumping, riding for pleasure and working.

    Specialisations: Stud Master/Mistress

  • Mixed Livestock Farmer

    Breeds and raises a variety of livestock.

  • Pig Farmer

    Breeds and raises pigs for meat and breeding stock.

    Specialisations: Pig Breeder

  • Poultry Farmer

    Breeds and raises chickens, turkeys, ducks and other poultry for eggs, meat and breeding stock.

    Specialisations: Egg Producer, Hatchery Manager (Poultry)

  • Sheep Farmer

    Breeds and raises sheep for wool, meat and breeding stock.

    Specialisations: Stud Sheep Farmer, Wool Grower

  • Other Livestock Farmers

    Includes Alpaca Farmer, Crocodile Farmer, Dog Breeder, Emu Farmer, Llama Farmer, Ostrich Farmer

Fast Facts

  • $981 Weekly Pay
  • 77,300 workers Employment Size
  • Stable Future Growth
  • Very high skill Skill level rating
  • Lower unemployment Unemployment
  • 72.2% Full-Time Full-Time Share
  • 54.8 hours Average full-time
  • 58 years Average age
  • 30.9% female Gender Share

The number of Livestock Farmers grew strongly over the past 5 years and is expected to stay about the same over the next 5 years:
from 77,300 in 2018 to 75,200 by 2023.
Job openings can come from new jobs being created, but most come from turnover (workers leaving).
There are likely to be less than 1,000 job openings over 5 years.

  • Size: This is a very large occupation.
  • Unemployment: Unemployment was below average in 2017.
  • Location: Livestock Farmers work in many regions of Australia. Many work in Victoria.
  • Industries: Most work in the Agriculture, Forestry and Fishing industry.
  • Earnings: Full-time workers earn around $981 per week (below the all jobs average of $1,230). Earnings tend to be lower when starting out and higher as experience grows.
  • Full-time: Many work full-time (72.2%, similar to the all jobs average of 68.4%).
  • Hours: Full-time workers spend around 54.8 hours per week at work (compared to the all jobs average of 40.0 hours).
  • Age: The average age is 58 years (compared to the all jobs average of 40 years). Many workers are 45 years or older (77%).
  • Gender: 30.9% of workers are female (compared to the all jobs average of 46.7%).

Employment Outlook

Number of Workers

Source: ABS Labour Force Survey, Department of Jobs and Small Business trend data to May 2018 and Department of Jobs and Small Business projections to 2023.
YearNumber of Workers
2008106600
2009100600
2010101800
201179700
201285900
201368200
201480300
201574900
201669400
201768600
201877300
202375200

Weekly Earnings

Weekly Earnings (Before Tax)

Source: Based on ABS Characteristics of Employment survey, August 2015, Cat. No. 6333.0, Customised Report. Median earnings are before tax and do not include superannuation. Earnings can vary greatly depending on the skills and experience of the worker and the demands of the role. These figures should be used as a guide only, not to determine a wage rate.
EarningsLivestock FarmersAll Jobs Average
Full-Time Earnings9811230

Main Industries

Main Employing Industries (% Share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2017, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Industries are based on the Australian and New Zealand Standard Industrial Classification (ANZSIC 06).
Main Employing IndustriesIndustry (% share)
Agriculture, Forestry and Fishing97.6
Manufacturing0.5
Other Services0.5
Wholesale Trade0.4
Other Industries1.0

States and Territories

  • NSW

  • VIC

  • QLD

  • SA

  • TAS

  • NT

  • ACT

Employment by State and Territory (% Share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2017, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Share of workers across Australian States and Territories, in this job compared to the all jobs average.
StateLivestock FarmersAll Jobs Average
NSW23.031.6
VIC46.726.2
QLD14.319.7
SA3.96.7
WA8.310.8
TAS3.52.0
NT0.11.1
ACT0.21.8

Age Profile

Age Profile (% Share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2017, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Age profile of workers in this job compared to the all jobs average.
Age BracketLivestock FarmersAll Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
15-191.3-5.25.2
20-242.2-9.99.9
25-347.1-23.623.6
35-4412.3-21.721.7
45-5417.9-20.820.8
55-5911.7-8.88.8
60-6415.3-6.06.0
65 and Over32.1-4.04.0

Education Level

Highest Level of Education (% Share)

Source: ABS, Education and Work (2016). Findings based on use of ABS TableBuilder data. Highest qualification completed by workers in this job (in any field of study). Skill level requirements can change over time, the qualifications needed by new workers might be different from the qualifications of workers already in the job.
Type of QualificationLivestock FarmersAll Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
Post Graduate/Graduate Diploma or Graduate Certificate5.7-8.68.6
Bachelor degree12.9-17.917.9
Advanced Diploma/Diploma11.9-10.110.1
Certificate III/IV18.7-18.918.9
Year 1210.1-18.718.7
Years 11 & 1028.7-17.717.7
Below Year 1011.9-8.18.1

At least 5 years of relevant experience is usually needed to work in this job (that's a skill level equal to a Bachelor Degree or higher).

Before starting a course, check it will provide you with the skills and qualifications you need.

  • Compare undergraduate and postgraduate student experiences and outcomes on the QILT website.
  • Compare Vocational Education and Training (VET) courses, providers and student outcomes on the My Skills website.
  • You might be interested in Agriculture, Horticulture and Conservation & Land Management VET training pathways on the AAPathways website.

The course listings on this page are provided by Good Education Group.

Employers look for Livestock Farmers who can communicate and connect well with others and are reliable.

Knowledge

These are important topics, subjects or knowledge areas.

  1. Biology

    74% Important

    Plant and animal organisms, their tissues, cells, functions, how they rely on and work with each other and the environment.

  2. Administration and Management

    68% Important

    Planning and coordination of people and resources.

  3. Mechanical

    63% Important

    Machines and tools, including their designs, uses, repair, and maintenance.

  4. Education and Training

    61% Important

    Teaching and course design.

  5. Food Production

    60% Important

    Planting, growing, and harvesting food (both plant and animal), including storage and handling.

Occupational Information Network
O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.
The importance ratings on this page are derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2, 45-1011.08 - First-Line Supervisors of Animal Husbandry and Animal Care Workers.

Learn about the daily activities, and physical and social demands faced by workers. Explore the values and work styles that workers rate as most important.

Activities

These are kinds of activities workers regularly do in this job.

  1. Making Decisions and Solving Problems

    90% Important

    Using information to work out the best solution and solve problems.

  2. Guiding, Directing and Motivating Staff

    86% Important

    Guiding and directing staff, including setting performance standards and monitoring performance.

  3. Monitor Processes, Materials, or Surroundings

    85% Important

    Checking objects, actions, or events, keeping an eye out for problems.

  4. Organizing, Planning, and Prioritizing Work

    83% Important

    Deciding on goals and putting together a detailed plan to get the work done.

  5. Identifying Objects, Actions, and Events

    81% Important

    Comparing objects, actions, or events, looking for differences between them or changes over time.

Occupational Information Network
O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.
The importance ratings on this page are derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2, 45-1011.08 - First-Line Supervisors of Animal Husbandry and Animal Care Workers.

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