Artistic Directors, and Media Producers and Presenters plan, administer and review activities concerned with producing artistic media, determine artistic policies for performing arts organisations, prepare and present news, sports and other information, and conduct interviews and introduce music, performances and special events on radio and television.

A skill level equal to a Bachelor Degree or higher, or at least 5 years of relevant experience is usually needed. High levels of creative talent or personal commitment and interest are also important.

Tasks

  • managing artistic and media productions to meet quality, cost and timing specifications
  • formulating and developing organisations' artistic policies and selecting and planning organisations' artistic programs
  • hiring and managing artistic staff
  • controlling the use of media production facilities such as studios and editing equipment, stage and film equipment and rehearsal time
  • directing the formulation of media production strategies, policies and plans
  • introducing programs, music, entertainment items, guests and celebrities
  • preparing and reading news bulletins, making special announcements and providing commentary for sports and other events
  • presenting opinions on sports, politics, and social and economic matters
  • researching, investigating and compiling stories and programs

Job Titles

  • Artistic Director
  • Media Producer (excluding Video)
  • Radio Presenter or Announcer
  • Television Presenter
  • Artistic Director

    Determines and oversees implementation of artistic policies for a performing arts organisation such as a theatre company, dance company, music ensemble, festival or venue.

  • Media Producer (excluding Video)

    Plans, administers and reviews activities concerned with publishing, or the production of films, television or radio programs, theatre, music, festivals or other artistic activities.

    Specialisations: Executive Producer, Film Producer, Stage Producer, Television Producer

  • Radio Presenter or Announcer

    Prepares and presents news, sports or other information, conducts interviews, and introduces music, performances and special events on radio.

    Specialisations: Disc Jockey (Radio), Talkback Host, Tourism Radio Presenter

  • Television Presenter

    Prepares and presents news, sports or other information, conducts interviews, and introduces music, performances and special events on television.

Fast Facts

  • $1,466 Weekly Pay
  • 14,100 workers Employment Size
  • Moderate Future Growth
  • Very high skill Skill level rating
  • Average unemployment Unemployment
  • 73.2% Full-Time Full-Time Share
  • 43.6 hours Average full-time
  • 38.5 years Average age
  • 44.7% female Gender Share

The number of Artistic Directors, Media Producers & Presenters stayed fairly stable over the past 5 years and is expected to grow moderately over the next 5 years:
from 14,100 in 2017 to 15,000 by 2022.
There are likely to be around 8,000 job openings over this time from workers leaving and new jobs being created.

  • Size: This is a medium sized occupation.
  • Unemployment: Unemployment was average in 2017.
  • Location: Artistic Directors, Media Producers & Presenters work in many regions of Australia. Many work in New South Wales.
  • Industries: Most work in Information Media and Telecommunications; Arts and Recreation Services; and Professional, Scientific and Technical Services.
  • Earnings: Full-time workers earn around $1,466 per week (higher than the all jobs average of $1,230). Earnings tend to be lower when starting out and higher as experience grows.
  • Full-time: Many work full-time (73.2%, similar to the all jobs average of 68.4%).
  • Hours: Full-time workers spend around 43.6 hours per week at work (compared to the all jobs average of 40.0 hours).
  • Age: The average age is 39 years (compared to the all jobs average of 40 years).
  • Gender: 44.7% of workers are female (compared to the all jobs average of 46.7%).

Employment Outlook

Number of Workers

Source: ABS Labour Force Survey, Department of Jobs and Small Business trend data to May 2017 and Department of Jobs and Small Business projections to 2022.
YearNumber of Workers
20079500
20089100
200910900
201012500
20119800
201214100
201310600
201411000
201515600
201615000
201714100
202215000

Weekly Earnings

Weekly Earnings (Before Tax)

Source: Based on ABS Characteristics of Employment survey, August 2015, Cat. No. 6333.0, Customised Report. Median earnings are before tax and do not include superannuation. Earnings can vary greatly depending on the skills and experience of the worker and the demands of the role. These figures should be used as a guide only, not to determine a wage rate.
EarningsArtistic Directors, Media Producers and PresentersAll Jobs Average
Full-Time Earnings14661230

Main Industries

Main Employing Industries (% Share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2017, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Industries are based on the Australian and New Zealand Standard Industrial Classification (ANZSIC 06).
Main Employing IndustriesIndustry (% share)
Information Media and Telecommunications61.9
Arts and Recreation Services16.7
Professional, Scientific and Technical Services15.7
Administrative and Support Services2.3
Other Industries3.4

States and Territories

  • NSW

  • VIC

  • QLD

  • SA

  • TAS

  • NT

  • ACT

Employment by State and Territory (% Share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2017, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Share of workers across Australian States and Territories, in this job compared to the all jobs average.
StateArtistic Directors, Media Producers and PresentersAll Jobs Average
NSW53.331.6
VIC23.426.2
QLD7.219.7
SA4.66.7
WA7.310.8
TAS2.32.0
NT0.71.1
ACT1.41.8

Age Profile

Age Profile (% Share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2017, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Age profile of workers in this job compared to the all jobs average.
Age BracketArtistic Directors, Media Producers and PresentersAll Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
15-190.0-5.25.2
20-246.9-9.99.9
25-3430.5-23.623.6
35-4433.3-21.721.7
45-5418.0-20.820.8
55-594.9-8.88.8
60-644.9-6.06.0
65 and Over1.6-4.04.0

Education Level

Highest Level of Education (% Share)

No data is available for the selected graph for this Occupation.

A skill level equal to a Bachelor Degree or higher, or at least 5 years of relevant experience is usually needed. High levels of creative talent or personal commitment and interest are also important.

Before starting a course, check it will provide you with the skills and qualifications you need.

  • Compare undergraduate and postgraduate student experiences and outcomes on the QILT website.
  • Compare Vocational Education and Training (VET) courses, providers and student outcomes on the My Skills website.
  • You might be interested in Creative Arts and Culture VET training pathways on the AAPathways website.

The course listings on this page are provided by Good Education Group.

Employers look for Artistic Directors, Media Producers & Presenters who have strong interpersonal skills, can communicate well with a variety of people and work well in a team.

Knowledge

These are important topics, subjects or knowledge areas.

  1. Sales and Marketing

    89% Important

    Showing, promoting, and selling products or services. This includes marketing strategy and tactics, product demonstration, sales techniques, and sales control systems.

  2. English Language

    87% Important

    English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.

  3. Communications and Media

    83% Important

    Media production, communication, and dissemination. Includes written, spoken, and visual media.

  4. Computers and Electronics

    78% Important

    Circuit boards, processors, chips, electronic equipment, and computer hardware and software, including applications and programming.

  5. Design

    77% Important

    Design techniques, tools, and principles used to make detailed technical plans, blueprints, drawings, and models.

Occupational Information Network
O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.
The importance ratings on this page are derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2, 27-1011.00 - Art Directors.

Learn about the daily activities, and physical and social demands faced by workers. Explore the values and work styles that workers rate as most important.

Activities

These are kinds of activities workers regularly do in this job.

  1. Thinking Creatively

    98% Important

    Using your own ideas to developing, designing, or creating something new.

  2. Interacting With Computers

    96% Important

    Using computers and computer systems (including hardware and software) to program, write software, set up functions, enter data, or process information.

  3. Getting Information

    89% Important

    Looking for, getting and understanding different kinds of information.

  4. Building Good Relationships

    88% Important

    Building and keeping constructive and cooperative working relationships with others.

  5. Organizing, Planning, and Prioritizing Work

    87% Important

    Deciding on goals and putting together a detailed plan to get the work done.

Occupational Information Network
O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.
The importance ratings on this page are derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2, 27-1011.00 - Art Directors.

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