Vehicle Body Builders and Trimmers manufacture and repair prototype production units and purpose-built vehicle bodies, and install, repair and replace the interior trim of vehicles.

A Certificate III/IV is usually needed to work in this job and three quarters of workers have this qualification. Training is most commonly through an apprenticeship which combines on-the-job training with the qualification. Registration or licensing may be required.

Tasks

  • constructing framework sections in metal, wood, fibreglass and other materials using shaping machines and cutting and welding equipment
  • bolting, screwing, riveting and welding sections together to form complete frameworks
  • cutting and shaping panels of sheetmetal, aluminium and reinforced plastic and attaching to frameworks using hand and power tools
  • modifying assembly line vehicles to special requirements
  • preparing new vehicle trim work according to drawings and sketches, and removing old coverings and fittings from vehicles and taking new measurements
  • selecting and cutting pieces of fabric, vinyl and leather and sewing pieces together using heavy-duty sewing machines
  • installing internal trim in vehicles such as lining, floor coverings and armrests
  • attaching door trims, rubber seals, locks and handles

Job Titles

  • Vehicle Body Builder or Maker
  • Vehicle Trimmer
  • Vehicle Body Builder or Maker

    Manufactures and repairs prototype production units and purpose-built vehicle bodies such as buses, trucks, fire engines and caravans. Registration or licensing may be required.

    Specialisations: Coach Builder

  • Vehicle Trimmer

    Installs, repairs and replaces the interior trim of vehicles such as seats, linings, floor coverings and door trims. Registration or licensing may be required.

    Specialisations: Vehicle Upholsterer

Fast Facts

  • $1,030 Weekly Pay
  • 4,000 workers Employment Size
  • Stable Future Growth
  • Medium skill Skill level rating
  • Lower unemployment Unemployment
  • 86.2% Full-Time Full-Time Share
  • 42.6 hours Average full-time
  • 37 years Average age
  • 2.3% female Gender Share

The number of Vehicle Body Builders and Trimmers fell over the past 5 years and is expected to stay about the same over the next 5 years:
from 4,000 in 2018 to 4,000 by 2023.
Job openings can come from new jobs being created, but most come from turnover (workers leaving).
There are likely to be around 2,000 job openings over 5 years (that's about 400 a year).

  • Size: This is a very small occupation.
  • Unemployment: Unemployment was below average in 2017.
  • Location: Vehicle Body Builders and Trimmers work in many regions of Australia. Many work in Queensland.
  • Industries: Most work in Manufacturing; Other Services; and Transport, Postal and Warehousing.
  • Earnings: Full-time workers earn around $1,030 per week (below the all jobs average of $1,230). Earnings tend to be lower when starting out and higher as experience grows.
  • Full-time: Most work full-time (86.2%, much higher than the all jobs average of 68.4%).
  • Hours: Full-time workers spend around 42.6 hours per week at work (compared to the all jobs average of 40.0 hours).
  • Age: The average age is 37 years (compared to the all jobs average of 40 years). Many workers are under 25 years of age (28.4%).
  • Gender: 2.3% of workers are female (compared to the all jobs average of 46.7%).

Employment Outlook

Number of Workers

Source: ABS Labour Force Survey, Department of Jobs and Small Business trend data to May 2018 and Department of Jobs and Small Business projections to 2023.
YearNumber of Workers
20085200
20095300
20106800
20115300
20123900
20136100
20146400
20155800
20165900
20176400
20184000
20234000

Weekly Earnings

Weekly Earnings (Before Tax)

Source: Based on ABS Characteristics of Employment survey, August 2015, Cat. No. 6333.0, Customised Report. Median earnings are before tax and do not include superannuation. Earnings can vary greatly depending on the skills and experience of the worker and the demands of the role. These figures should be used as a guide only, not to determine a wage rate.
EarningsVehicle Body Builders and TrimmersAll Jobs Average
Full-Time Earnings10301230

Main Industries

Main Employing Industries (% Share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2017, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Industries are based on the Australian and New Zealand Standard Industrial Classification (ANZSIC 06).
Main Employing IndustriesIndustry (% share)
Manufacturing62.5
Other Services30.9
Transport, Postal and Warehousing4.2
Retail Trade2.1
Other Industries0.3

States and Territories

  • NSW

  • VIC

  • QLD

  • SA

  • TAS

  • NT

  • ACT

Employment by State and Territory (% Share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2017, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Share of workers across Australian States and Territories, in this job compared to the all jobs average.
StateVehicle Body Builders and TrimmersAll Jobs Average
NSW17.231.6
VIC22.326.2
QLD38.919.7
SA6.66.7
WA14.310.8
TAS0.42.0
NT0.31.1
ACT0.01.8

Age Profile

Age Profile (% Share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2017, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Age profile of workers in this job compared to the all jobs average.
Age BracketVehicle Body Builders and TrimmersAll Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
15-191.9-5.25.2
20-2426.5-9.99.9
25-3423.5-23.623.6
35-4413.4-21.721.7
45-5420.3-20.820.8
55-593.7-8.88.8
60-647.7-6.06.0
65 and Over3.1-4.04.0

Education Level

Highest Level of Education (% Share)

No data is available for the selected graph for this Occupation.

A Certificate III/IV is usually needed to work in this job and three quarters of workers have this qualification. Training is most commonly through an apprenticeship which combines on-the-job training with the qualification. Registration or licensing may be required.

Before starting a course, check it will provide you with the skills and qualifications you need.

  • Compare undergraduate and postgraduate student experiences and outcomes on the QILT website.
  • Compare Vocational Education and Training (VET) courses, providers and student outcomes on the My Skills website.
  • You might be interested in Automotive Retail, Service and Repair and Automotive Manufacturing Sector VET training pathways on the AAPathways website.

The course listings on this page are provided by Good Education Group.

Employers look for Vehicle Body Builders and Trimmers who are reliable, work well in a team and have a strong work ethic.

Knowledge

These are important topics, subjects or knowledge areas.

  1. Production and Processing

    83% Important

    Raw materials, production processes, quality control, costs, and ways of making and distributing goods.

  2. Mathematics

    73% Important

    Arithmetic, algebra, geometry, calculus, or statistics.

  3. Education and Training

    72% Important

    Teaching and course design.

  4. Mechanical

    70% Important

    Machines and tools, including their designs, uses, repair, and maintenance.

  5. Engineering and Technology

    65% Important

    Use engineering science and technology to design and produce goods and services.

Occupational Information Network
O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.
The importance ratings on this page are derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2, 51-4022.00 - Forging Machine Setters, Operators, and Tenders, Metal and Plastic.

Learn about the daily activities, and physical and social demands faced by workers. Explore the values and work styles that workers rate as most important.

Activities

These are kinds of activities workers regularly do in this job.

  1. Controlling Machines and Processes

    84% Important

    Operate machines or processes either directly or using controls (not including computers or vehicles).

  2. Getting Information

    84% Important

    Looking for, getting and understanding different kinds of information.

  3. Handling and Moving Objects

    82% Important

    Using hands and arms in handling, installing, positioning, and moving materials, and manipulating things.

  4. Communicating with Supervisors, Peers, or Staff

    81% Important

    Giving information to supervisors, co-workers, and staff by telephone, in written form, e-mail, or in person.

  5. Identifying Objects, Actions, and Events

    81% Important

    Comparing objects, actions, or events, looking for differences between them or changes over time.

Occupational Information Network
O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.
The importance ratings on this page are derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2, 51-4022.00 - Forging Machine Setters, Operators, and Tenders, Metal and Plastic.

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