Panelbeaters repair damage to metal, fibreglass and plastic body work on vehicles, and form replacement vehicle panels.

Also known as: Collision Repairer.

Either extensive experience or an apprenticeship in automotive body repair technology or another relevant panel beating course is needed to work as a Panelbeater.

Tasks

  • removing damaged panels and parts, and removing upholstery and accessories to gain access
  • removing dents by hammering panels
  • straightening damaged vehicles and parts using mechanical and hydraulic equipment
  • replacing badly damaged sections with new or second-hand panels
  • filling depressions with plastic filler, and filing, grinding and sanding repaired surfaces
  • cutting and joining replacement sections using welding equipment
  • fitting repaired or replacement panels on vehicles and refitting body hardware such as door locks and trims
  • may assist vehicle body builders in constructing and restoring custom-designed, vintage and other specialty vehicles
  • may spray-paint vehicles

All Panelbeaters

  • $1,280 Weekly Pay
  • Stable Future Growth
  • Unavailable Unemployment
  • 12,400 workers Employment Size
  • Medium skill Skill level rating
  • 89% Full-Time Full-Time Share
  • 43 hours Average full-time
  • 41 years Average age
  • 2% female Gender Share

The number of people working as Panelbeaters (in their main job) fell over 5 years:
from 16,700 in 2014 to 12,400 in 2019.

Caution: The Australian jobs market is changing in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. These estimates do not take account of the impact of COVID-19. They may not reflect the current jobs market and should be used and interpreted with extreme caution.

  • Size: This is a medium sized occupation.
  • Location: Panelbeaters work in many regions of Australia.
  • Industries: Most work in the Other Services industry.
  • Earnings: Full-time workers on an adult wage earn around $1,280 per week (below the average of $1,460). Earnings tend to be lower when starting out and higher as experience grows.
  • Full-time: Most work full-time (89%, much higher than the average of 66%).
  • Hours: Full-time workers spend around 43 hours per week at work (compared to the average of 44 hours).
  • Age: The average age is 41 years (compared to the average of 40 years).
  • Gender: 2% of workers are female (compared to the average of 48%).

Employment Outlook

Number of Workers

Caution: The 2019 employment projections do not take account of any impact caused by the COVID-19 pandemic and are therefore no longer reflective of current labour market conditions. As such, they should be used, and interpreted, with extreme caution. Source: ABS Labour Force Survey, National Skills Commission trend data to May 2019 and projections to 2024.
YearNumber of Workers
200918400
201014900
201116700
201214100
201316000
201416700
201518900
201611900
201718500
201815400
201912400
202412200

Weekly Earnings

Weekly Earnings (Before Tax)

Source: Based on ABS Survey of Employee Earnings and Hours (cat. no. 6306.0), May 2018, Customised Report. Median weekly total cash earnings for full-time non-managerial employees paid at the adult rate. Earnings are before tax and include amounts salary sacrificed. Earnings can vary greatly depending on the skills and experience of the worker and the demands of the role. These figures should be used as a guide only, not to determine a wage rate.
EarningsPanelbeatersAll Jobs Average
Full-Time Earnings12801460

Main Industries

Main Employing Industries (% Share)

Source: Based on ABS Census 2016, Customised Report. Industries are based on the Australian and New Zealand Standard Industrial Classification (ANZSIC 06).
Main Employing IndustriesIndustry (% share)
Other Services94.8
Retail Trade1.2
Transport, Postal and Warehousing1.1
Manufacturing0.8
Other Industries2.1

States and Territories

  • NSW

  • VIC

  • QLD

  • SA

  • TAS

  • NT

  • ACT

Employment by State and Territory (% Share)

Source: Based on ABS Census 2016, Customised Report. Share of workers across Australian States and Territories, in this job compared to the all jobs average.
StatePanelbeatersAll Jobs Average
NSW32.931.6
VIC27.325.6
QLD18.420.0
SA8.17.0
WA9.610.8
TAS2.02.0
NT0.71.0
ACT1.11.9

Age Profile

Age Profile (% Share)

Source: Based on ABS Census 2016, Customised Report. Age profile of workers in this job compared to the all jobs average.
Age BracketPanelbeatersAll Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
15-195.3-5.05.0
20-2410.4-9.39.3
25-3420.0-22.922.9
35-4422.3-22.022.0
45-5423.1-21.621.6
55-599.3-9.09.0
60-646.1-6.06.0
65 and Over3.4-4.24.2

Education Level

Highest Level of Education (% Share)

Source: ABS Census 2016, Customised Report. Highest qualification completed by workers in this job (in any field of study). Qualifications needed by new workers might be different from the qualifications of workers already in the job.
Type of QualificationPanelbeatersAll Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
Post Graduate/Graduate Diploma or Graduate Certificate0.1-10.110.1
Bachelor degree0.8-21.821.8
Advanced Diploma/Diploma1.6-11.611.6
Certificate III/IV78.9-21.121.1
Year 126.3-18.118.1
Year 112.7-4.84.8
Year 10 and below9.6-12.512.5

Either extensive experience or an apprenticeship in automotive body repair technology or another relevant panel beating course is needed to work as a Panelbeater.

Checks, licences and tickets

You may need:

  • licence to undertake vehicle repair work from your relevant state or territory authority

Thinking about study or training?

Before starting a course, check it will provide you with the skills and qualifications you need.

  • Compare Vocational Education and Training (VET) courses, providers and student outcomes on the My Skills website.
  • You might be interested in Automotive Retail, Service and Repair and Automotive Manufacturing Sector VET training pathways on the AAPathways website.

Or check out related courses on Job Outlook.

Useful links and resources


The course listings on this page are provided by Good Education Group.

Employers look for Panelbeaters who are reliable, trustworthy and responsible.

Filter Skills & Knowledge

Knowledge

These are important topics, subjects or knowledge areas.

  1. Mechanical

    62% Skill level

    Machines and tools, including their designs, uses, repair, and maintenance.

  2. Chemistry

    49% Skill level

    Chemical composition, structure, and properties. How chemicals are made, used, mixed, and can change.

  3. English language

    42% Skill level

    English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.

  4. Production and processing

    42% Skill level

    Raw materials, production processes, quality control, costs, and ways of making and distributing goods.

  5. Computers and electronics

    40% Skill level

    Circuit boards, processors, chips, electronic equipment, and computer hardware and software, including applications and programming.

Occupational Information Network
O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.
The skills and importance ratings on this page are derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2, 49-3021.00 - Automotive Body and Related Repairers.

Learn about the daily activities, and physical and social demands faced by workers. Explore the values and work styles that workers rate as most important.

Filter Work Environment

Demands

The physical and social demands workers face most often are shown below.

  1. Using your hands to handle, control, or feel

    96% Important

    Spend time using your hands to handle, control, or feel objects, tools or controls.

  2. Being exact or accurate

    94% Important

    Be very exact or highly accurate.

  3. Spend time standing

    91% Important

    Spend time standing at work.

  4. Exposure to contaminants

    90% Important

    Be exposed to pollutants, gases, dust or odours.

  5. Wear common protective or safety equipment

    84% Important

    Wear equipment like safety shoes, glasses, gloves, hard hats or life jackets.

Occupational Information Network
O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.
The skills and importance ratings on this page are derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2, 49-3021.00 - Automotive Body and Related Repairers.

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