ALERT The future growth information does not take account of the impact of COVID-19. If you are affected by COVID-19 there is a range of support available.

Railway Signal Operators

ANZSCO ID 712917

Overview

All Other Stationary Plant Operators

  • $1,886 Weekly Pay
  • Strong Future Growth

Railway Signal Operators

  • 1,100 workers Employment Size
  • Lower skill Skill level rating
  • 89% Full-Time Full-Time Share
  • 46 hours Average full-time
  • 45 years Average age
  • 10% female Gender Share

Railway Signal Operators control the movement of trains, and assemble and disassemble trains within a marshalling yard.

Also known as: Railway Switching and Signalling Operator.

Specialisations: Railway Shunter, Railway Yard Assistant.

You can work as a Railway Signal Operator without formal qualifications, however, a certificate III or IV in mechanical or electrical rail signalling may be useful.

Tasks
  • Directs trains within marshalling yards.
  • Breaks apart and join train wagons and carriages.
  • Places wagons, carriages and engines into sidings.
  • Directs outgoing trains to the main line.
  • May conduct safety checks.

Prospects

Pathways

You can work as a Railway Signal Operator without formal qualifications, however, a certificate III or IV in mechanical or electrical rail signalling may be useful.

Before starting a course, check it will provide you with the skills and qualifications you need. Visit

  • My Skills to compare Vocational Education and Training (VET) courses, providers and student outcomes.

Skills & Knowledge

Employers look for Stationary Plant Operators who communicate well with others, are polite, courteous and reliable.

Filter Skills & Knowledge

Knowledge

These are important topics, subjects or knowledge areas.

  1. Transportation

    61% Skill level

    Moving people or goods by air, rail, sea, or road.

  2. Public safety and security

    52% Skill level

    Use of equipment, rules and ideas to protect people, data, property, and institutions.

  3. Mechanical

    50% Skill level

    Machines and tools, including their designs, uses, repair, and maintenance.

  4. Customer and personal service

    47% Skill level

    Understanding customer needs, providing good quality service, and measuring customer satisfaction.

  5. Education and training

    47% Skill level

    Curriculum and training design, teaching and instruction for individuals and groups, and the measurement of training effects.

  6. Law and government

    38% Skill level

    How our laws and courts work. Government rules and regulations, and the political system.

  7. Administration and management

    37% Skill level

    Business principles involved in strategic planning, leadership, and coordinating people and resources.

  8. English language

    36% Skill level

    English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.

  9. Psychology

    34% Skill level

    Human behaviour; differences in ability, personality, and interests; learning and motivation; research methods; assessing and treating disorders.

  10. Clerical

    34% Skill level

    Word processing, managing files and records, stenography and transcription, designing forms, and other office work.

  11. Engineering and technology

    28% Skill level

    Use engineering, science and technology to design and produce goods and services.

  12. Mathematics

    28% Skill level

    Arithmetic, algebra, geometry, calculus, or statistics.

  13. Personnel and human resources

    27% Skill level

    Recruiting and training people, managing pay and other entitlements (like sick leave), and negotiating pay and conditions.

  14. Telecommunications

    26% Skill level

    Transmission, broadcasting, switching, control, and operation of telecommunications systems.

  15. Computers and electronics

    24% Skill level

    Circuit boards, processors, chips, electronic equipment, and computer hardware and software, including applications and programming.

  16. Production and processing

    24% Skill level

    Raw materials, production processes, quality control, costs, and ways of making and distributing goods.

  17. Physics

    20% Skill level

    The physical laws of matter, motion and energy, and how they interact through space and time.

  18. Chemistry

    14% Skill level

    Chemical composition, structure, and properties. How chemicals are made, used, mixed, and can change.

  19. Sales and marketing

    13% Skill level

    Showing, promoting, and selling including marketing strategy, product demonstration, sales techniques, and sales control systems.

  20. Communications and media

    13% Skill level

    Media production, communication, and dissemination. Includes written, spoken, and visual media.

Skills

Skills can be improved through training or experience.

  1. Operation monitoring

    46% Skill level

    Watching gauges, dials, or other indicators to make sure a machine is working properly.

  2. Operation and control

    46% Skill level

    Controlling equipment or systems.

  3. Monitoring

    43% Skill level

    Keeping track of how well work is progressing so you can make changes or improvements.

  4. Coordination with others

    43% Skill level

    Being adaptable and coordinating work with other people.

  5. Reading comprehension

    39% Skill level

    Reading work related information.

  6. Critical thinking

    39% Skill level

    Thinking about the pros and cons of different ways to solve a problem.

  7. Time management

    39% Skill level

    Managing your own and other peoples' time to get work done.

  8. Troubleshooting

    39% Skill level

    Figuring out why a machine or system went wrong and working out what to do about it.

  9. Complex problem solving

    37% Skill level

    Noticing a problem and figuring out the best way to solve it.

  10. Judgment and decision making

    37% Skill level

    Figuring out the pros and cons of different options and choosing the best one.

  11. Quality control analysis

    37% Skill level

    Doing tests and checking products, services, or processes to make sure they are working properly.

  12. Instructing

    37% Skill level

    Teaching people how to do something.

  13. Active listening

    36% Skill level

    Listening to others, not interrupting, and asking good questions.

  14. Writing

    36% Skill level

    Writing things for co-workers or customers.

  15. Learning strategies

    36% Skill level

    Figuring out the best way to teach or learn something new.

  16. Active learning

    34% Skill level

    Being able to use what you have learnt to solve problems now and again in the future.

  17. Speaking

    32% Skill level

    Talking to others.

  18. Management of personnel resources

    32% Skill level

    Motivating, developing, and directing people as they work, and choosing the best people for the job.

  19. Serving others

    32% Skill level

    Looking for ways to help people.

  20. Social perceptiveness

    30% Skill level

    Understanding why people react the way they do.

Abilities

Workers use these physical and mental abilities.

  1. Far vision

    57% Skill level

    See details that are far away.

  2. Control precision

    52% Skill level

    Quickly change the controls of a machine, car, truck or boat.

  3. Extent flexibility

    52% Skill level

    Bend, stretch, twist, or reach with your body, arms, and/or legs.

  4. Auditory attention

    50% Skill level

    Pay attention to a certain sound when there are other distracting sounds.

  5. Reaction time

    50% Skill level

    Quickly move your hand, finger, or foot when a sound, light, picture or something else appears.

  6. Oral comprehension

    48% Skill level

    Listen to and understand what people say.

  7. Problem spotting

    48% Skill level

    Notice when something is wrong or is likely to go wrong, even if you can't solve the problem.

  8. Multilimb coordination

    46% Skill level

    Use your arms and/or legs at the same time while sitting, standing, or lying down.

  9. Selective attention

    46% Skill level

    Pay attention to something without being distracted.

  10. Near vision

    45% Skill level

    See details that are up-close (within a few feet).

  11. Trunk strength

    45% Skill level

    Use your abdominal and lower back muscles a number of times without 'giving out' or fatiguing.

  12. Perceptual speed

    43% Skill level

    Use your eyes to quickly compare groups of letters, numbers, pictures, or other things.

  13. Whole body coordination

    43% Skill level

    Move your arms, legs, and body together.

  14. Balance

    43% Skill level

    Keep your balance or stay upright.

  15. Finger dexterity

    43% Skill level

    Put together small parts with your fingers.

  16. Manual dexterity

    43% Skill level

    Quickly move your hand to grasp, manipulate, or assemble objects.

  17. Colour discrimination

    41% Skill level

    Notice differences between colours, including shades of colour and brightness.

  18. Depth perception

    41% Skill level

    Decide which thing is closer or further away from you, or decide how far away it is.

  19. Arm-hand steadiness

    38% Skill level

    Keep your hand or arm steady.

  20. Speech recognition

    34% Skill level

    Identify and understand the speech of another person.

Activities

These are kinds of activities workers regularly do in this job.

  1. Doing physically active work

    82% Skill level

    Use your arms, legs and whole body, such as climbing, lifting, balancing, walking, stooping, and handling objects.

  2. Looking for changes over time

    75% Skill level

    Comparing objects, actions, or events. Looking for differences between them or changes over time.

  3. Monitoring people, processes and things

    74% Skill level

    Checking objects, actions, or events, and keeping an eye out for problems.

  4. Handling and moving objects

    74% Skill level

    Using hands and arms in handling, installing, positioning, moving and manipulating objects.

  5. Checking compliance with standards

    69% Skill level

    Deciding whether events or processes comply with laws, regulations, or standards.

  6. Checking for errors or defects

    68% Skill level

    Inspecting equipment, structures, or materials for errors, problems or defects.

  7. Researching and investigating

    66% Skill level

    Looking for, getting and understanding different kinds of information.

  8. Building good relationships

    60% Skill level

    Building good working relationships and keeping them over time.

  9. Controlling equipment or machines

    59% Skill level

    Operating machines or processes either directly or using controls (not including computers or vehicles).

  10. Keeping your knowledge up-to-date

    58% Skill level

    Keeping up-to-date with technology and new ideas.

  11. Communicating within a team

    58% Skill level

    Giving information to co-workers by telephone, in writing, or in person.

  12. Planning and prioritising work

    56% Skill level

    Deciding on goals and putting together a detailed plan to get the work done.

  13. Assessing and evaluating things

    55% Skill level

    Working out the value, importance, or quality of things, services or people.

  14. Documenting or recording information

    54% Skill level

    Entering, transcribing, recording, storing, or maintaining information in written or electronic/magnetic form.

  15. Estimating amounts, costs and resources

    54% Skill level

    Working out sizes, distances, amounts, time, costs, resources, or materials needed for a task.

  16. Making decisions and solving problems

    54% Skill level

    Using information to work out the best solution and solve problems.

  17. Driving vehicles or equipment

    52% Skill level

    Running, manoeuvring, navigating, or driving things like forklifts, vehicles, aircraft, or water craft.

  18. Collecting and organising information

    51% Skill level

    Compiling, coding, categorizing, calculating, tabulating, auditing, or checking information or data.

  19. Training and teaching others

    50% Skill level

    Understanding the needs of others, developing training programs, and teaching or instructing.

  20. Coordinating the work of a team

    48% Skill level

    Getting members of a group to work together to finish a task.

Occupational Information Network
O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.
The skills and importance ratings on this page are derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2, 53-4021.00 - Railroad Brake, Signal, and Switch Operators.

Work Environment

Learn about the daily activities, and physical and social demands faced by workers. Explore the values and work styles that workers rate as most important.

Filter Work Environment

Demands

The physical and social demands workers face most often are shown below.

  1. Outdoors, exposed to weather

    100% Important

    Work outdoors, exposed to the weather.

  2. Loud or uncomfortable sounds

    98% Important

    Be exposed to noises and sounds that are distracting or uncomfortable.

  3. Exposure to contaminants

    97% Important

    Be exposed to pollutants, gases, dust or odours.

  4. Dangerous equipment

    96% Important

    Work near dangerous equipment like saws, machinery with open moving parts, or moving traffic.

  5. Consequence of error

    94% Important

    Work where mistakes have serious consequences.

  6. Very hot or cold temperatures

    93% Important

    Work in very hot or cold temperatures.

  7. Wear common protective or safety equipment

    88% Important

    Wear equipment like safety shoes, glasses, gloves, hard hats or life jackets.

  8. Face-to-face discussions

    88% Important

    Talk with people face-to-face.

  9. Teamwork

    87% Important

    Work with people in a group or team.

  10. Contact with people

    87% Important

    Have contact with people by telephone, face-to-face, or any other way.

  11. In an enclosed vehicle or equipment

    87% Important

    Work in a closed vehicle (e.g., car).

  12. Bright or inadequate lighting

    85% Important

    Work in extremely bright or dark lighting conditions.

  13. Time pressure

    85% Important

    Work to strict deadlines.

  14. Health and safety of others

    85% Important

    Take responsibility for the health and safety of others.

  15. Frequent decision making

    84% Important

    Frequently make decisions that impact other people.

  16. Impact of decisions

    83% Important

    Make decisions that have a large impact on other people.

  17. Freedom to make decisions

    83% Important

    Have freedom to make decision on your own.

  18. Using your hands to handle, control, or feel

    82% Important

    Spend time using your hands to handle, control, or feel objects, tools or controls.

  19. Dangerous conditions

    79% Important

    Work near dangers like high voltage electricity, flammable material, explosives or chemicals.

  20. Telephone

    77% Important

    Talk on the telephone.

Values

Work values are important to a person’s feeling of satisfaction. All six values are shown below.

  1. Support

    76% Important

    Supportive management that stands behind employees. Workers are treated fairly by their company, they are supported by management, and have supervisors who train them well.

  2. Relationships

    62% Important

    Serve and work with others. Workers usually get along well with each other, do things to help other people, and are rarely pressured to do things that go against their sense of right and wrong.

  3. Working conditions

    52% Important

    Job security and good working conditions. There is usually a steady flow of interesting work, and the pay and conditions are generally good.

  4. Independence

    43% Important

    Work alone and make decisions. Workers are able to try out their own ideas, make decisions on their own, and work with little or no supervision.

  5. Achievement

    38% Important

    Results oriented. Workers are able to use their strongest abilities, giving them a feeling of accomplishment.

  6. Recognition

    29% Important

    Advancement and the potential to lead. Workers are recognised for the work that they do, they may give directions and instructions to others, and they are looked up to in their company and their community.

Interests

Interests are the style or type of work we prefer to do. All interest areas are shown below.

  1. Practical

    100% Important

    Practical, hands-on work. Often with plants and animals, or materials like wood, tools, and machinery.

  2. Administrative

    48% Important

    Following set procedures and routines. Working with numbers and details more than with ideas, usually following rules.

  3. Enterprising

    33% Important

    Starting up and carrying out projects. Leading people and making many decisions. Sometimes require risk taking and often deal with business.

  4. Analytical

    19% Important

    Ideas and thinking. Searching for facts and figuring out problems in your head.

  5. Helping

    19% Important

    Working with people. Helping or providing service to others.

  6. Creative

    14% Important

    Working with forms, designs and patterns. Often need self-expression and can be done without following rules.

Occupational Information Network
O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.
The skills and importance ratings on this page are derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2, 53-4021.00 - Railroad Brake, Signal, and Switch Operators.

All Other Stationary Plant Operators

  • $1,886 Weekly Pay
  • Strong Future Growth

Railway Signal Operators

  • 1,100 workers Employment Size
  • Lower skill Skill level rating
  • 89% Full-Time Full-Time Share
  • 46 hours Average full-time
  • 45 years Average age
  • 10% female Gender Share

Railway Signal Operators control the movement of trains, and assemble and disassemble trains within a marshalling yard.

Also known as: Railway Switching and Signalling Operator.

Specialisations: Railway Shunter, Railway Yard Assistant.

You can work as a Railway Signal Operator without formal qualifications, however, a certificate III or IV in mechanical or electrical rail signalling may be useful.

Tasks
  • Directs trains within marshalling yards.
  • Breaks apart and join train wagons and carriages.
  • Places wagons, carriages and engines into sidings.
  • Directs outgoing trains to the main line.
  • May conduct safety checks.

You can work as a Railway Signal Operator without formal qualifications, however, a certificate III or IV in mechanical or electrical rail signalling may be useful.

Before starting a course, check it will provide you with the skills and qualifications you need. Visit

  • My Skills to compare Vocational Education and Training (VET) courses, providers and student outcomes.

Employers look for Stationary Plant Operators who communicate well with others, are polite, courteous and reliable.

Filter Skills & Knowledge

Knowledge

These are important topics, subjects or knowledge areas.

  1. Transportation

    61% Skill level

    Moving people or goods by air, rail, sea, or road.

  2. Public safety and security

    52% Skill level

    Use of equipment, rules and ideas to protect people, data, property, and institutions.

  3. Mechanical

    50% Skill level

    Machines and tools, including their designs, uses, repair, and maintenance.

  4. Customer and personal service

    47% Skill level

    Understanding customer needs, providing good quality service, and measuring customer satisfaction.

  5. Education and training

    47% Skill level

    Curriculum and training design, teaching and instruction for individuals and groups, and the measurement of training effects.

  6. Law and government

    38% Skill level

    How our laws and courts work. Government rules and regulations, and the political system.

  7. Administration and management

    37% Skill level

    Business principles involved in strategic planning, leadership, and coordinating people and resources.

  8. English language

    36% Skill level

    English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.

  9. Psychology

    34% Skill level

    Human behaviour; differences in ability, personality, and interests; learning and motivation; research methods; assessing and treating disorders.

  10. Clerical

    34% Skill level

    Word processing, managing files and records, stenography and transcription, designing forms, and other office work.

  11. Engineering and technology

    28% Skill level

    Use engineering, science and technology to design and produce goods and services.

  12. Mathematics

    28% Skill level

    Arithmetic, algebra, geometry, calculus, or statistics.

  13. Personnel and human resources

    27% Skill level

    Recruiting and training people, managing pay and other entitlements (like sick leave), and negotiating pay and conditions.

  14. Telecommunications

    26% Skill level

    Transmission, broadcasting, switching, control, and operation of telecommunications systems.

  15. Computers and electronics

    24% Skill level

    Circuit boards, processors, chips, electronic equipment, and computer hardware and software, including applications and programming.

  16. Production and processing

    24% Skill level

    Raw materials, production processes, quality control, costs, and ways of making and distributing goods.

  17. Physics

    20% Skill level

    The physical laws of matter, motion and energy, and how they interact through space and time.

  18. Chemistry

    14% Skill level

    Chemical composition, structure, and properties. How chemicals are made, used, mixed, and can change.

  19. Sales and marketing

    13% Skill level

    Showing, promoting, and selling including marketing strategy, product demonstration, sales techniques, and sales control systems.

  20. Communications and media

    13% Skill level

    Media production, communication, and dissemination. Includes written, spoken, and visual media.

Skills

Skills can be improved through training or experience.

  1. Operation monitoring

    46% Skill level

    Watching gauges, dials, or other indicators to make sure a machine is working properly.

  2. Operation and control

    46% Skill level

    Controlling equipment or systems.

  3. Monitoring

    43% Skill level

    Keeping track of how well work is progressing so you can make changes or improvements.

  4. Coordination with others

    43% Skill level

    Being adaptable and coordinating work with other people.

  5. Reading comprehension

    39% Skill level

    Reading work related information.

  6. Critical thinking

    39% Skill level

    Thinking about the pros and cons of different ways to solve a problem.

  7. Time management

    39% Skill level

    Managing your own and other peoples' time to get work done.

  8. Troubleshooting

    39% Skill level

    Figuring out why a machine or system went wrong and working out what to do about it.

  9. Complex problem solving

    37% Skill level

    Noticing a problem and figuring out the best way to solve it.

  10. Judgment and decision making

    37% Skill level

    Figuring out the pros and cons of different options and choosing the best one.

  11. Quality control analysis

    37% Skill level

    Doing tests and checking products, services, or processes to make sure they are working properly.

  12. Instructing

    37% Skill level

    Teaching people how to do something.

  13. Active listening

    36% Skill level

    Listening to others, not interrupting, and asking good questions.

  14. Writing

    36% Skill level

    Writing things for co-workers or customers.

  15. Learning strategies

    36% Skill level

    Figuring out the best way to teach or learn something new.

  16. Active learning

    34% Skill level

    Being able to use what you have learnt to solve problems now and again in the future.

  17. Speaking

    32% Skill level

    Talking to others.

  18. Management of personnel resources

    32% Skill level

    Motivating, developing, and directing people as they work, and choosing the best people for the job.

  19. Serving others

    32% Skill level

    Looking for ways to help people.

  20. Social perceptiveness

    30% Skill level

    Understanding why people react the way they do.

Abilities

Workers use these physical and mental abilities.

  1. Far vision

    57% Skill level

    See details that are far away.

  2. Control precision

    52% Skill level

    Quickly change the controls of a machine, car, truck or boat.

  3. Extent flexibility

    52% Skill level

    Bend, stretch, twist, or reach with your body, arms, and/or legs.

  4. Auditory attention

    50% Skill level

    Pay attention to a certain sound when there are other distracting sounds.

  5. Reaction time

    50% Skill level

    Quickly move your hand, finger, or foot when a sound, light, picture or something else appears.

  6. Oral comprehension

    48% Skill level

    Listen to and understand what people say.

  7. Problem spotting

    48% Skill level

    Notice when something is wrong or is likely to go wrong, even if you can't solve the problem.

  8. Multilimb coordination

    46% Skill level

    Use your arms and/or legs at the same time while sitting, standing, or lying down.

  9. Selective attention

    46% Skill level

    Pay attention to something without being distracted.

  10. Near vision

    45% Skill level

    See details that are up-close (within a few feet).

  11. Trunk strength

    45% Skill level

    Use your abdominal and lower back muscles a number of times without 'giving out' or fatiguing.

  12. Perceptual speed

    43% Skill level

    Use your eyes to quickly compare groups of letters, numbers, pictures, or other things.

  13. Whole body coordination

    43% Skill level

    Move your arms, legs, and body together.

  14. Balance

    43% Skill level

    Keep your balance or stay upright.

  15. Finger dexterity

    43% Skill level

    Put together small parts with your fingers.

  16. Manual dexterity

    43% Skill level

    Quickly move your hand to grasp, manipulate, or assemble objects.

  17. Colour discrimination

    41% Skill level

    Notice differences between colours, including shades of colour and brightness.

  18. Depth perception

    41% Skill level

    Decide which thing is closer or further away from you, or decide how far away it is.

  19. Arm-hand steadiness

    38% Skill level

    Keep your hand or arm steady.

  20. Speech recognition

    34% Skill level

    Identify and understand the speech of another person.

Activities

These are kinds of activities workers regularly do in this job.

  1. Doing physically active work

    82% Skill level

    Use your arms, legs and whole body, such as climbing, lifting, balancing, walking, stooping, and handling objects.

  2. Looking for changes over time

    75% Skill level

    Comparing objects, actions, or events. Looking for differences between them or changes over time.

  3. Monitoring people, processes and things

    74% Skill level

    Checking objects, actions, or events, and keeping an eye out for problems.

  4. Handling and moving objects

    74% Skill level

    Using hands and arms in handling, installing, positioning, moving and manipulating objects.

  5. Checking compliance with standards

    69% Skill level

    Deciding whether events or processes comply with laws, regulations, or standards.

  6. Checking for errors or defects

    68% Skill level

    Inspecting equipment, structures, or materials for errors, problems or defects.

  7. Researching and investigating

    66% Skill level

    Looking for, getting and understanding different kinds of information.

  8. Building good relationships

    60% Skill level

    Building good working relationships and keeping them over time.

  9. Controlling equipment or machines

    59% Skill level

    Operating machines or processes either directly or using controls (not including computers or vehicles).

  10. Keeping your knowledge up-to-date

    58% Skill level

    Keeping up-to-date with technology and new ideas.

  11. Communicating within a team

    58% Skill level

    Giving information to co-workers by telephone, in writing, or in person.

  12. Planning and prioritising work

    56% Skill level

    Deciding on goals and putting together a detailed plan to get the work done.

  13. Assessing and evaluating things

    55% Skill level

    Working out the value, importance, or quality of things, services or people.

  14. Documenting or recording information

    54% Skill level

    Entering, transcribing, recording, storing, or maintaining information in written or electronic/magnetic form.

  15. Estimating amounts, costs and resources

    54% Skill level

    Working out sizes, distances, amounts, time, costs, resources, or materials needed for a task.

  16. Making decisions and solving problems

    54% Skill level

    Using information to work out the best solution and solve problems.

  17. Driving vehicles or equipment

    52% Skill level

    Running, manoeuvring, navigating, or driving things like forklifts, vehicles, aircraft, or water craft.

  18. Collecting and organising information

    51% Skill level

    Compiling, coding, categorizing, calculating, tabulating, auditing, or checking information or data.

  19. Training and teaching others

    50% Skill level

    Understanding the needs of others, developing training programs, and teaching or instructing.

  20. Coordinating the work of a team

    48% Skill level

    Getting members of a group to work together to finish a task.

Occupational Information Network
O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.
The skills and importance ratings on this page are derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2, 53-4021.00 - Railroad Brake, Signal, and Switch Operators.

Learn about the daily activities, and physical and social demands faced by workers. Explore the values and work styles that workers rate as most important.

Filter Work Environment

Demands

The physical and social demands workers face most often are shown below.

  1. Outdoors, exposed to weather

    100% Important

    Work outdoors, exposed to the weather.

  2. Loud or uncomfortable sounds

    98% Important

    Be exposed to noises and sounds that are distracting or uncomfortable.

  3. Exposure to contaminants

    97% Important

    Be exposed to pollutants, gases, dust or odours.

  4. Dangerous equipment

    96% Important

    Work near dangerous equipment like saws, machinery with open moving parts, or moving traffic.

  5. Consequence of error

    94% Important

    Work where mistakes have serious consequences.

  6. Very hot or cold temperatures

    93% Important

    Work in very hot or cold temperatures.

  7. Wear common protective or safety equipment

    88% Important

    Wear equipment like safety shoes, glasses, gloves, hard hats or life jackets.

  8. Face-to-face discussions

    88% Important

    Talk with people face-to-face.

  9. Teamwork

    87% Important

    Work with people in a group or team.

  10. Contact with people

    87% Important

    Have contact with people by telephone, face-to-face, or any other way.

  11. In an enclosed vehicle or equipment

    87% Important

    Work in a closed vehicle (e.g., car).

  12. Bright or inadequate lighting

    85% Important

    Work in extremely bright or dark lighting conditions.

  13. Time pressure

    85% Important

    Work to strict deadlines.

  14. Health and safety of others

    85% Important

    Take responsibility for the health and safety of others.

  15. Frequent decision making

    84% Important

    Frequently make decisions that impact other people.

  16. Impact of decisions

    83% Important

    Make decisions that have a large impact on other people.

  17. Freedom to make decisions

    83% Important

    Have freedom to make decision on your own.

  18. Using your hands to handle, control, or feel

    82% Important

    Spend time using your hands to handle, control, or feel objects, tools or controls.

  19. Dangerous conditions

    79% Important

    Work near dangers like high voltage electricity, flammable material, explosives or chemicals.

  20. Telephone

    77% Important

    Talk on the telephone.

Values

Work values are important to a person’s feeling of satisfaction. All six values are shown below.

  1. Support

    76% Important

    Supportive management that stands behind employees. Workers are treated fairly by their company, they are supported by management, and have supervisors who train them well.

  2. Relationships

    62% Important

    Serve and work with others. Workers usually get along well with each other, do things to help other people, and are rarely pressured to do things that go against their sense of right and wrong.

  3. Working conditions

    52% Important

    Job security and good working conditions. There is usually a steady flow of interesting work, and the pay and conditions are generally good.

  4. Independence

    43% Important

    Work alone and make decisions. Workers are able to try out their own ideas, make decisions on their own, and work with little or no supervision.

  5. Achievement

    38% Important

    Results oriented. Workers are able to use their strongest abilities, giving them a feeling of accomplishment.

  6. Recognition

    29% Important

    Advancement and the potential to lead. Workers are recognised for the work that they do, they may give directions and instructions to others, and they are looked up to in their company and their community.

Interests

Interests are the style or type of work we prefer to do. All interest areas are shown below.

  1. Practical

    100% Important

    Practical, hands-on work. Often with plants and animals, or materials like wood, tools, and machinery.

  2. Administrative

    48% Important

    Following set procedures and routines. Working with numbers and details more than with ideas, usually following rules.

  3. Enterprising

    33% Important

    Starting up and carrying out projects. Leading people and making many decisions. Sometimes require risk taking and often deal with business.

  4. Analytical

    19% Important

    Ideas and thinking. Searching for facts and figuring out problems in your head.

  5. Helping

    19% Important

    Working with people. Helping or providing service to others.

  6. Creative

    14% Important

    Working with forms, designs and patterns. Often need self-expression and can be done without following rules.

Occupational Information Network
O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.
The skills and importance ratings on this page are derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2, 53-4021.00 - Railroad Brake, Signal, and Switch Operators.
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